I am a total newby at all things crunchy, so bear with what may seem to be silly questions. I am pregnant, second trimester, and I see in the explanation above that you recommend avoiding EO’sduring pregnancy. I am interested in them for cleaning purposes, both home and body. Are you saying I shouldn’t use them in home made lotions and soaps, or just for direct massage? More explaination please.
The Mountain Rose Herbs essential oil company strives to sell the absolute finest quality of essential oils. All of their products are certified organic, and an attitude of “People and Planet before Profit” runs through their whole company. Their sustainability principles range from Zero Waste Certification to an Energy Efficiency operations program that helps reduce their company’s carbon footprint.

Vetiver is another oil that’s been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years, appreciated for its soothing, healing, and protective qualities. Its number one benefit, however, is its antioxidant properties, known to fight free radicals and keep toxins and environmental pollutants out of the body. One study, by the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Clemson University in South Carolina, found vetiver oil to have one of the strongest “free radical scavenging” abilities when compared to other popular antioxidants. That’s one reason it’s used so commonly in aromatherapy sessions. Another impressive benefit of vetiver oil is its ability to reduce anxiety. One study published by Srinakharinwirot University in Bangkok, Thailand, found that, when given to rats, vetiver oil had the same impact as Diazepam, a medication that treats anxiety. More recent research has even linked vetiver oil to treating ADHD and ADD, which is increasingly common in adults as well as children.


After asking the patients to record their headache severity and associated symptoms every 30 minutes for a total of 2 hours, researchers found that the difference between the controls and treated patients was statistically significant. From 129 headache attacks in the treatment group, 92 responded entirely or partially to lavender. In the control group, 32 out of 68 headache attacks responded to the placebo. (19)
A. While there are no extensive studies on the efficacy of aromatherapy, many small studies have indicated good results from various oils. Lavender, in particular, has been shown to have strong anti-anxiety and anti-insomnia effects. Tea tree oil is another essential oil with proven abilities to combat many types of skin infections and irritations.

There are certain essential oils that should not be taken internally (this can be researched on Mountain Rose Herb website from this article as they list the ones that are beneficial for internal use i.e.: digestive), but some of the common EO’s may be taken internally when mixed with something (i.e.: baked goods, water, etc.). I have personally used lemon and peppermint for this and I really like it. The standard I’ve seen is a drop per 8 ounces although I prefer about half that because I tend to use it in a larger container and drink it through out the day…if you don’t drink it all right away, the flavor seems to increase a bit over time). Be sure to mix/shake it well before drinking.
Estrogenic and antiandrogenic activity have been reported by in vitro study of tea tree oil and lavender essential oils. Two published sets of case reports suggest the lavender oil may be implicated in some cases of gynecomastia, an abnormal breast tissue growth in prepubescent boys.[44][45] The European Commission's Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety dismissed the claims against tea tree oil as implausible, but did not comment on lavender oil.[46] In 2018, a BBC report on a study stated that tea tree and lavender oils contain eight substances that when tested in tissue culture experiments, increasing the level of estrogen and decreasing the level of testosterone. Some of the substances are found in "at least 65 other essential oils". The study did not include animal or human testing.[47] 

It did start out quite small for me, however.  Just a small list of companies.  I started out looking into these companies, but the list quickly grew as the series went on and as more and more readers commented and as I went down more and more rabbit trails.  I think you will find the whole thing interesting and I hope you will learn a thing or two about essential oils and the companies that sell them.
No, DoTerra has NOT “done research. They are a multi-level marketing company using false claims about products. They pretend their products are the “most pure”, they invented a phrase indicating they are certified when they are not, and they are actually telling people – against ALL evidence that this is safe – to INGEST some of the oils. Stay away.
i am affiliated with a like minded company, Essante Organics. every item is toxic free, non gmo, and small green footprint. having doterra, young living, and essante oils and comparing same types, i am positive essante is the better of the three. essante’s company philosophy is better also. check them out. EssanteOrganics.com/julieparks i’m confident you will be impressed.
Vetiver has been used in aromatherapy as an essential oil for anxiety and stress for centuries, and recent research is confirming that indeed that plant has effects on anxiety pathways. One study on rats found that Vetiver essential oil attenuated the stress and anxiety response in the amygdala of rats, an area of the brain associated with fear and other similar emotions. [24]
IF Your Bottle Of EO Says 100% Pure But Not For Internal Use It Isn’t Pure. If It Says Ok For InterNal Use It Is Pure. Young Living Did Some Testing On Another Lavender EO froM Another Company And It Tested That It hAd Vanilla In It. The Product Did Say 100% Pure On It. Well If It Was 100% Pure It Wouldnt Have Had Vanilla In It. I Use Yl Eo & I Love Them. I Take Them InternallY.Yes Their Expensive But Im A True BelieveR You Get WhAt You Pay For!
After certain plants are processed through the various extraction methods available, a high concentration of potent medicinal compounds are produced. This makes essential oils a more viable medical option than the plants themselves, as it often takes a large amount of plant matter to create even 10ml of pure essential oil. Because of the fat solubility of many essential oils, they are quickly absorbed into the human body, and easily delivered to all cells.
Tea tree oil! I did not even think of this as an essential oil product. It has been a staple of my bathroom cabinet for years as a shampoo additive. One or two drops in the bottle of shampoo and those pesky head lice (that I frequently encounter in elementary school settings) are goners! I have waist length hair, and after contracting lice a couple of times, I asked my primary physician what I could do besides keep my hair up (a possibility) or cutting it short (not happening).
For an essential oil that is safe to take internally, only use 1-2 drops in a gel capsule (available here) or diluted in 6-8 ounces of water. Remember, one drop can be the equivalent of taking many pounds of raw plant matter so a little goes a long way. If you take an essential oil internally and it feels too strong, try drinking a few ounces of water, eating an absorbent food like organic bread and additionally taking activated charcoal or bentonite clay to soak it up. This should reduce any discomfort significantly. However, if you take one drop as recommended above you should be fine. Remember to start slow and only use essential oils internally that are safe to do so. Also, do not take more than 1 or 2 drops per day and take a break every few weeks to allow your body time to adjust.

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I’m still a beginner but I know that for many essential oils, you need what is called a carrier oil. These carrier oils mixed with the essential oil are what make it safe for skin. I suggest looking into getting the book ( aromatherapy for beginners) if you are serious about it. I’m still reading it but it has a tone of info, meanings, recipes and helpful terms of understanding. Also, it has a handy section in the back about resources online and in books to learn more and to find your essential oils. Good luck. 😀
I’ve read the other blog about homemade deodorant and im looking to give it a shot. recently ive had painful reactions to deodorant and antiperspirant (all types and brands, even natural or organic like toms and green beaver) so im trying to get down to fewer and fewer ingredients. i have some essential tea tree oil and mixed it with some coconut oil but i still stink 🙁 . Im looking for an oil that i can use that will be strong but relatively “neutral” in smell ( im a guy so im not too interested in smelling like lavender), but it has to be able to be put on my skin without any reactions. Anyone have any suggestions?
If you’re staring at the ceiling at night and want to add essential oils to your insomnia arsenal without committing to an expensive brand, Natrogix’s 18-bottle selection can help you figure out what works for you for a budget price. Aside from a rainbow of some of the most popular essential oils, this kit also includes a recipe e-book—if using lavender or chamomile alone doesn’t help you fall asleep, you’ll have guidance creating your own blend.
There are many natural oils that can help to clear out toxins and impurities from our bodies. Chemicals and toxins can easily find their way into our internal systems these days – and often, they can damage our health in more ways than we realize. This is why it can be important to ensure that we promote the process of detoxification with essential oils.
One of the problems with companies like doTERRA and Young Living, just as with the pharmaceutical companies, the chemical manufacturers, any other one cares to mention, is that, when they have testing done, they are the ones paying for it and, consequently, tend to receive the results they desire. Like it or not, the one who foots the bill controls the outcome of the studies. Both companies claim to have the ONLY truly pure, therapeutic grade oil. The truth is . . . . bull hockey! The reality is that there is no truth in that statement! Before you start throwing stones at me, please read the rest of what I am writing and make a truly informed decision of your own.
I’ve read the other blog about homemade deodorant and im looking to give it a shot. recently ive had painful reactions to deodorant and antiperspirant (all types and brands, even natural or organic like toms and green beaver) so im trying to get down to fewer and fewer ingredients. i have some essential tea tree oil and mixed it with some coconut oil but i still stink 🙁 . Im looking for an oil that i can use that will be strong but relatively “neutral” in smell ( im a guy so im not too interested in smelling like lavender), but it has to be able to be put on my skin without any reactions. Anyone have any suggestions?
Every bottle of Plant Therapy oil has a batch code on the bottle. You can use it to look up the GC/MS report, which lists all the chemical components of a particular batch. "If you see something like GC/MS, that's important to know," says Lutzi. "That means that it's a higher quality oil because they did spectrometry on it to identify the levels of actual active oil constituents." Add these fall-themed blends to your cart if you love the smell of PSLs. ($25; amazon.com)

I have spent a lot of time on here debunking the myths put forth by glassy eyed cult followers and over zealous MLM reps and the main stream aromatherapy community loves it when I do this. But turnabout is fair play. Now its time to clear up a myth on the other side of aromatherapy. I see almost daily where people say things like “therapeutic grade” doesn’t exist or there is no such thing as a therapeutic grade standard. But to say there is no such thing as a TG standard is like saying there is no such thing as essential oils.


As for this set, it’s a great way to get some commonly used essential oils for a deal, as they are cheaper in this set than they would be individually. This set includes: Bergamot, Clary Sage, Cinnamon Cassia, Eucalyptus (Globules), Grapefruit, Lavender, Lemon, Lime, Patchouli, Peppermint Supreme, Rosemary, Spearmint, Orange & Tea Tree. They all smell reasonable to my untrained nose – not overpowering and cloying like artificial fragrance, and not weird and stinky like chemicals. The only one I can say I’m not super fond of is the Patchouli, but it’s because I’m not fond of the smell of Patchouli, not because it’s bad quality. I’ve already found lots of uses for these oils - they work great in bath bombs and in a diffuser, too. I’ve also discovered a nifty use for them: if you clean with vinegar but hate the smell, you can add 5 drops of peppermint and 5 drops of orange to the spray bottle full of vinegar, and by the next day, the smell changes! It smells far, far less vinegar-y after that. I use them in my spray-mop solution and it works great for that, too.
Defined as the hybrid of a sour orange and a lemon, Bergamot is a fruit used for its essential oil, and it's really common in perfumes and beauty products thanks to its sweet, citrusy smell. Since it's also antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and capable of improving your mood, this oil is an awesome pick if you make your own homemade soaps, deodorants, and cosmetics. It's also effective in balms and chapsticks, as it can heal wounds.

Eucalyptus Globulus essential oil is popular for its known ability to help with respiratory issues. This oil is also perfect to use after strenuous exercise or overexertion, it can help with relieving muscle or joint pain. Eucalyptus Globulus can also help with aging by comforting the joints and muscles. Finally, use this oil everyday to help focus the mind, promote body relaxation, and normal circulation.
Do they promote the unsafe use of essential oils? Some companies, many of the MLM companies included, promote some very unsafe practices, using essential oils. If you want to be a Registered Aromatherapist you have to follow certain safety rules to remain registered, including the use of internal ingestion (unless you are a health care practitioner trained at an appropriate clinical level.), undiluted use, and Raindrop Techniques (Aroma Touch or other similar techniques.). These practices are prohibited by the AIA (Alliance of International Aromatherapists) if you want to remain a registered member.  You can read more about essential oil safety and ingestion.
I’ve used YL and DōTERRA and a few other unheard of brands of essential oils and you have got to check out Ameo Essential oils! It’s a brand new company and I’ve been very impressed with the quality of their oils. Another neat thing they do is show results of the testing of every batch of their oils to prove that they are the same high quality, pure, clinical standard oil as used in research and testing. The scientific research is just amazing with these oils.
It’s easy to fall into the aforementioned "there’s an oil for that" mentality because many people use similar oils for common ailments. But with aromatherapy, it’s equally important to consider your personal smell preference. For example, Spikenard’s sedative effect makes it a go-to for insomniacs. But I know some people who just cannot stomach the smell and would prefer to use lavender or vetiver for sleep. Aromatherapy is an intimately personal science; It’s not one size fits all when it comes to blending.

While the uses for these essential oils can be anything from clearing skin to healing damaged hair, one of the major things essential oils can help with is anxiety. (Jenna Dewan Tatum even uses them to beat stress.) Stress-induced anxiety is extremely common: It's what you feel when you're running late to a meeting, making a big presentation in front of your boss, or dealing with a huge fight with your partner and, bam—your heart starts to race, your pulse skyrockets, and it becomes hard to focus. What's more: Anxiety is the most common mental health illness in the U.S., affecting over 18 percent of adults each year. And while essential oils should never be used as a replacement for prescribed anxiety medication, they can be an additional stress reliever, or help people with stress-induced, situational anxiety. (This Weird Test Could Predict Anxiety and Depression Before You Experience Symptoms.)
I have purchased from Edens Garden a number of times. I really enjoy your products. Before making a decision, I sent a number of inquiries to them about their oils. They are very good a sending back information to help you make your decision. From everything I have learned: They are 100% pure. They have cut out the middle man so they can lower the price and they have quick service. I have purchased the same thing from a couple different places and find I like the Edens Garden best. (I can afford these, not some of the other brands, too) I personally haven’t found any discrepancies.
The most effective way to consume them, according to “The Healing Intelligence of Essential Oils: The Science of Advanced Aromatherapy,” is to add a drop of oil in a glass of water or in a teaspoon with honey. (16) You can simply add a drop or two underneath the tongue. This is beneficial because the blood capillaries are so close to the surface of the tissue under the tongue, allowing them to pass more quickly into the bloodstream and travel to the different areas of the body where they’re needed. (17)
In our scent tests the Stillpoint’s oils started off smelling mild and fresh, but then after a minute or two they magically blossomed and became very rich, deep, vibrant, stronger and more clear; almost like a fine wine opens up after being uncorked for some time. And for those who may be sensitive to subtle energies, these oils possessed a very clean and high vibration, which is an enormous benefit when using the oils for spiritual practice. No other oils we tested performed this way.

To start with the basics, we have the monetary issues. Very few of the distributors ever see any money. As a great example, 92% of Young Living distributors make an average of $1 a month. MLM companies can also charge prices that would never be sustainable in the open-market. For example, Young Living will happily sell you 2 bottles of berry juice for nearly $100.


Young Living oils are therapeutic grade and some of them can be applied neat but many recommend at least a 1:1 with a carrier. Always research the oils and know how to dilute them but also understand that your body may tell you that 1:4 peppermint is too diluted and isn’t giving you the best benefits. Each person responds to oils differently and should allow their body time to respond to the oil. If after an extended time – YL recommends at least 25 minutes for their oils – you haven’t noticed any affect attempt the oil again with less dilution. Keep track of your responses to each oil and base your use on the notes you have taken.
Do not take essential oils internally, especially oils like wintergreen and eucalyptus. While some essential oils may be used well-diluted in something like toothpaste with safety, it’s generally recognized that there’s no need to take essential oils internally. In fact, there are several toxic essential oils that should be avoided even through skin contact. Luckily, these are NOT common essential oils, and most of them you’ll never find in the store.
You can ingest some essential oils and there are good reasons to do so. If they’re awesome outside the body, perhaps they would be inside too? They’re antifungal, antiviral, antibacterial, etc. Of course you need to be careful and use good judgement. Too much of anything can be bad for you. Candy companies & chocolatiers have been doing it for ages and there’s no reason you can’t too. I’m off to make some lavender blueberry scones. Good morning!
My favorite author once wrote, “there is nothing new under the sun.” People have been manipulated by products promising healing properties forever. Am I saying that all essential oils are dangerous? No. Am I saying that all people who purchase essential oils are being manipulated? No. Am I saying that all essential oils are being sold by terrible people? Absolutely not. I know wonderful, amazing people (who I truly love!) who sell essential oils. Here is what I am saying:
Frankincense, also known as "olibanum" is an aromatic resin that can be used to treat depression and anxiety due to its calming effect. A 2008 study in the journal Taehan Kanho Hakhoe Chi found this oil mixed with bergamot and lavender had a positive effect on pain and depression in hospice patients with terminal cancer. A simple aroma hand massage had a healing effect when essential oils were used.
Promising Review: “The set contains 6 oils: tea tree, eucalyptus, lavender, orange, peppermint, and lemongrass. I had never used essential oils before, but I bought the set to use with my humidifier/diffuser. They smell so nice and make me feel relaxed – especially the peppermint and orange. After reading more about essential oils, I started using the tea tree oil and lavender on my face (mixed with Aveeno moisturizer). It’s amazing how smooth and clear my skin has gotten after just two weeks. The only oil that I found distasteful was lemongrass. The scent is very strong. Overall I am pleasantly surprised by how much I am enjoying these oils.” – VM

According to the U.S. National Library of Medicine, essential oils are highly concentrated and contain active ingredients. For instance, it takes 220 lbs of lavender flowers to make 1 lb of lavender essential oil. Depending on their use, most essential oils should be diluted first before use. Diluting essential oils helps spread the aromatic, concentrated molecules over a larger area, making it easier and more comfortable for the body to absorb.
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