This makes smell unique among our senses. Information we take in from our other senses travels first to another region of the brain, the thalamus, which acts as a relay station, passing along sensory data to the other parts of the brain that produce our sensory perceptions. Only smell moves directly to the brain’s emotion and memory center. That’s why those memories you associate with the scent of garden roses, or banana bread baking in the oven, come on so quickly and so strongly.
LAVENDER. This is the most popular essential oil for sleep and relaxation among my patients, and my first, general go-to recommendation for people looking to try aromatherapy for sleep. Lavender is a soothing scent that’s long been associated with relaxation and sleep, and used as a natural remedy for anxiety. Lavender is probably the most rigorously studied essential oil. A robust body of research shows lavender has anxiety reducing—or anxiolytic—effects, as well as beneficial effects on depression. Lavender can also help with pain relief, several studies show. One recent study showed aromatherapy using lavender oil reduced the need for pain medications in a group of 6 to 12-year-old children recovering from having their tonsils removed. Lavender also has sedative effects, meaning it can work directly to help you fall asleep. A number of studies point to lavender’s effectiveness for sleep: improving sleep quality, increasing sleep amounts, and elevating daytime alertness, including in people with insomnia.
Hi. I have been buying my eos from a wholesaler called Bulk Apothecary at a very cheap price. They claim to be very pure and high quality, but the labels on products are pretty vague and I dont have much to compare the quality to, as I have never spent the extra money on more expensive ones. I cant. but I am a firm believer in using them, and am trying to build my collection. Do you know much about this company and their supply of eos? I would appreciate any feedback. Thank you.

As you've likely noticed, expanding your essential oil collection can get pretty expensive. If you're just starting out or you go through oils fast, consider this set from Plant Therapy. It comes with seven individual oils and seven blends for only $57, meaning that each bottle comes in at a little more than $4 each. You won't find this kind of deal anywhere else — especially since Plant Therapy is a trusted brand that uses only pure and therapeutic-grade ingredients. If that's not enough to sway you, it comes in an pretty wooden box and has over 400 reviews.
I am adding cinnamon leaf and clover EOs to my mouthwash with peppermint and tea tree EOs. Before I felt safe using the undiluted EOs but with these new additions I feel like I need carrier. The other ingredients are water, aloe water, baking soda, xylitol and witch hazel. Should I add a carrier oil and which one do you recommend? I was thinking avocado, sesame, grapeseed or olive oil. If the witch hazel has alcohol could this act as a carrier? How much alcohol per how many drops? I’ve heard its about 3-5 drops per teaspoon carrier oil (3-5%). Great post!
It turns out that for any of these companies to claim that their oil is 100% pure, only a very very small percentage of pure oil (less than 10% if I remember right) is required and the rest can be chemical additives. This particular company was one of the ones tested that did not mislead and did not have "filler" chemicals so that's why I personally made my purchase.
Though little known in the western part of the world, Vertiver, also called the khus grass in India, is actually important to the east. This is a versatile, dense, and aromatic plant; and is often woven into baskets and floor mats. The leaves are used to feed livestock; the pulp to make paper; and its extract to make a natural pesticide. However, it’s traditionally used as Ayurvedic medicine.
I've had great luck with ultrasonic cool-air diffusers. Bergamot is always a go-to when I'm feeling stressed, as its unique composition calms the mind and body while enhancing mood. Its limonene content allows for intense relaxation when inhaled, while the spicy citrus high notes immediately perk up the senses. It pairs well with a number of other scents, especially lavender and peppermint, which can also help reduce tension and anxiety.
This is a general summary for people who are using essential oils on a casual basis. 🙂 I didn’t want to muddy the waters here. However, I would gladly revise my statement if the oils were taken internally under the care of a naturopath or other professional. I just don’t think people should, willy nilly, run around taking them internally, due to their potency.
This isn’t a list of oils specifically, but they do have an up-to-date list of endangered plants http://www.unitedplantsavers.org/ This company is started by the same woman who helped start Mountain Rose Herbs, so they are trying to support farmers who will grow the endangered plants so we can have a sustainable supply of them on the market while they are being responsibly propagated. Its pretty awesome
I realize that it’s been a while since you posted this question, but hope this information helps anyway. My poor husband had the same problem with leg cramps. Took supplements for potassium and ate bananas and oranges like crazy. No difference. Heard then that the deficiency that causes these cramps is more likely related to magnesium, so he started taking a magnesium supplement. Still no difference.

Promising Review: “I’m an essential-oil snob. I collect oils for all sorts of therapeutic uses, mostly external. This is the first lavender oil I’ve purchased that has specifically stated it’s safe to ingest. I’ve been ingesting it, and I find it very anxiolytic; I take it in filtered still water or add it to sparkling water (this is my new favorite refreshment). The oil smells just as a good lavender oil should, and I’m impressed with the purity of it and its suitability for internal and external uses. It’s much easier and potent using this oil as opposed to making a messy tisane with dried lavender buds. I go through lavender oil faster than I do other oils (I think this is the case with most frequent users of essential oils, as it’s arguably a staple of any collection), and I’ll definitely make this my go-to brand/company for lavender oil.” – KittenLitter

Although SLO is standardized to 80 mg, a similar dose size can be calculated readily using a nonstandardized LEO. The density of lavender oil has been estimated to be around 0.88 g/mL at 20°C.28 Therefore, 0.1 mL of oil would be weigh approximately 88 to 89 mg. Assuming 20 drops per milliliter, this would equate to around 2 drops of LEO for a dose of 88 mg, although variability is to be expected given the imprecise nature of this calculation, and it may be more accurate to measure a volume or directly weigh the oil.
Additionally, essential oils tap into the relationship between your sense of smell and your brain. Your scent receptors send chemical messages to your limbic system, which is the area of the brain that controls basic emotions and memories. These signals that are sent to your brain from essential oils impact your brain's chemical production, which then affects your mental and physical health.
A few lines of inquiry have helped to elucidate potential mechanism(s) of action of LEO in anxiety-related conditions, which appears to be related to inhibition of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), reduction of 5HT1A receptor activity, and increased parasympathetic tone. A purely psychologic mechanism has been refuted in the case of LEO's anxiolytic effects because anosmic mice display inhibition of marble burying after lavender oil inhalation.29 Pharmacokinetic data after topical application in healthy human volunteers also demonstrated the ability of LEO's constituents linalool and linalyl acetate to rapidly penetrate cell membranes and reach serum concentrations in excess of 100 ng/mL, corroborating pharmacodynamic action.30
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