Many essential oils have anti-inflammatory, antiviral, antibacterial, antiseptic and anti-fungal properties that help to boost your immune system and fight infections. The chemical substances found in essential oils, such as terpenes, esters, phenolics, ethers and ketones, have the potential to fight foreign pathogens that can threaten your health. Some of the best essential oils for your immunity include oregano, myrrh, ginger, lemon, eucalyptus, frankincense, peppermint (or Mentha piperita) and cinnamon.
Want to feel refreshed instantly? Let the cooling effect of eucalyptus oil work its magic. With its strong minty aroma, eucalyptus oil is great for alleviating stress, boosting energy and mitigating mental fatigue. Eucalyptus oil is highly effective and works wonders when dealing with a cold, congestion and the flu. If you're under the weather or simply feeling sluggish and mentally exhausted, use this powerful essential oil to rejuvenate and stimulate the mind and body!
Some essential oils have even been applied to the dead as part of the embalming process. We know this because residues have been found in tombs dating over 2,000 years old! Essential oils are also prevalent in aromatherapy, which was advanced by French surgeon Jean Valnet, who learned that essential oils could help treat soldiers during World War II — a time when medications were scarce.
I have thin skin that’s prone to dryness. My skin care goals are to keep moisturized and prevent environmental damage and premature aging. I take a holistic approach to my face-care routine, always using essential oils high in esters that soothe dermal inflammation, monoterpenes that enhance dermal penetration, and monoterpene alcohols that are mild and generally well-tolerated by most skin types. While I always promote and see the value in essential oil synergies, for my daily face serum, I only use two oils: Helichrysum italicum and rose. Sometimes, I’ll add sandalwood to round out the aroma and reduce hyperpigmentation.
So what’s the bottom line on essential oils for anxiety? There really isn’t one, says Dr. Lee. “Some people find them really helpful, and some people say they do nothing for them,” he says. On the plus side, he says, they’re generally safe when used as directed—although there can be some risks associated with them, especially if they’re ingested orally or applied directly to the skin.

But what concerns me more than the money is the ability for misinformation to spread like wildfire. Much of the misinformation on essential oils comes directly from the distributors, whether they have the best intentions in the world or not. You see, when distributors take highly-concentrated chemicals, claim medicinal benefits typically based on personal experiences, and then sell them at house parties the same way I get Mary Kay lipstick or my favorite sugar cookie candles from Gold Canyon, confusion is bound to occur. Really, this type of sales hierarchy is not only a concern to me and my healthcare comrades, but it is a concern to many licensed naturopath doctors and aromatherapists as well. These professionals typically have extensive training and education, meanwhile many Young Living and doTerra distributors boast that signing up to sell oils takes mere minutes.


Most flowers contain too little volatile oil to undergo expression, but their chemical components are too delicate and easily denatured by the high heat used in steam distillation. Instead, a solvent such as hexane or supercritical carbon dioxide is used to extract the oils.[10] Extracts from hexane and other hydrophobic solvents are called concretes, which are a mixture of essential oil, waxes, resins, and other lipophilic (oil-soluble) plant material.
Many essential oils are said to support a normal mood and behavior, including feelings of anxiety. Studies back up these claims, with some research noting that essential oils may act as an “anxiety reducer, mood stabilizer, sedative, pain reliever, anticonvulsive, and neuroprotector.”(20) Thanks to a modern understanding of the brain, researchers can use neuroimaging to identify that essential oil can, in fact, change the way that the brain functions.
Choose certified pure therapeutic grade essential oils over synthetic ones. Unnatural chemically altered oils are not considered true essential oils. It is also important to note that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not regulate essential oils for quality or safety. Look for USDA Certified Organic or 100% essential oil on the label, instead of anything that says “perfume oil” or “aromatherapy oil,” which indicates the oil may have been blended with unnatural ingredients.
Essential oils come from the process of hydrodistillation, steam distillation, solvent extraction, extraction under pressure, or other mechanical means of extracting oils from various parts of a plant, such as the roots, leaves, seeds, peels, bark, or blossoms. The concentrated liquid extracts contain naturally occurring chemical compounds, including terpenes, esters, aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, phenols, and oxides, which are volatile, meaning they’ll evaporate quickly when exposed to air.(4) The different chemical compositions affect the aroma of each essential oil and how it is absorbed and used by the body.

I use peppermint EO after brushing my teeth on my tongue…it lasts so much longer than mouthwash, but is it safe to do this? I just take a couple of drops and rub it all over my tongue. I was concerned, however, after reading this article. Is the way I’m using it considered taking it internally? And, is it dangerous to do this since the oil has not been diluted in a carrier oil? Thanks!!


The simplest way to incorporate essential oils into one’s daily life is by inhaling them, she says—either via a diffuser that disperses fragrance into the air, or by sprinkling a few drops on objects like your pillow at night. (Essential oils can also be applied to the skin, used in bathing, or mixed into creams and lotions. But some people may find them irritating when applied topically, especially if they’re not diluted.)
Yes, many companies do GC/MS testing and infrared. The real test is, what do they compare the results to and what is that company’s standard for what a good oil is? If their standard is high, then they may reject oils which are below that standard. If their standard is not so high, then they will accept and sell more oils, even ones that have been rejected by a company with higher standards.
As you can see, the choice for the right essential oil brand can be very convoluted. There are so many brands on the market, it can be hard to sift through the duds to find the right ones. The key is taking a step back and listening to what the companies are saying. You should also make sure to read the labels, your essential oil label should say 100% pure and not “blend” or “with jojoba/almond” as that means they are already diluted and not just pure essential oil. According to The East-West School For Herbal and Aromatic Studies, some of the qualities that you want to look for in an essential oil supplier are:
Given current industry practices, you should also be wary of popular, gimmicky claims. Perhaps the most egregious is using the label "Therapeutic Grade." There is no such thing as "therapeutic grade" or "certified pure" essential oils. There is no regulatory body that scientifically evaluates and certifies the purity of essential oils. Some large, multilevel marketing brands have even trademarked or copyrighted these promotional sayings, but they are just misleading catchphrases. When purchasing oils, ask sellers if they provide data information sheets on their oils. Most quality distillers and retailers provide GC/MS (gas chromatography and mass spectrometry) testing results that show the chemical breakdown of their oils. This objective data can help you assess the quality of an oil when read (and tested!) properly.
So I am very "new" to Essential Oils and was looking to duplicate a "spa like" pure EO blend I purchased in London. My tendency is to look at the # of Amazon reviews for a product before reading them because if the numbers are high, then it's obviously a best seller.... right? In this case, I wondered why the prices were soooo vastly all over the board so I was puzzled....
I think Lavender and Frankincense are powerhouse oils that have so many uses! For me when emotional issues come up I ‘m finding the Worry Free Synergy, Self Esteem Synergy and Brain Aid Synergy and most anything citrusy are my go to oils. I do find for me most of the time I don’t love Bergamot it has a pungent sour type smell for me which is amusing as most say it is sweet and lovely. I would absolutely love to smell the Neroli single but haven’t yet.

Good question. I wonder what the moisture content of the estimated weights are (HUGE difference as water makes up the majority of a plants’ weight). Nevertheless, I would guess that the environmental impact is minimal to none as most of these plants are numerous compared to harvesting other plants such as hardwoods, rain forest plants, and even corn. Take lavender for example, if it takes 100 lbs to extract 1 lb, that is barely nothing when you consider that lavender grows wild and is abundant. One acre of lavender would probably produce over a ton of plant parts in one mowing for oil extraction (I am guessing based on my experience with a variety of different plant “harvesting”). And it grows fast. To compare weight, imagine mowing a one acre field of mixed weeds 3 ft tall down to 6 inches, you would have a few thousand pounds of plants that would quickly and naturally grow back in a couple weeks. The rose petals are at the extreme ratio but are expensive and used far less than the common oils.


The only oils on the market safe to ingest are by a company called Young Living. If you are not a member you can obtain Eucalyptus oil by typing in Young Living Essential Oil Eucalyptus on an ebay or amazon search engine to try it out. One you do, you will surely want to become a member of this company. I use these oils on myself and children and am being healed of YEARS of chronic illness with these products. I am not a salesperson. I feel obligated to get EVERYONE with health issues this REAL AND TRUE HEALING MEDICINE that heals rather than just treating symptoms.
Apply to the body directly. Some people find it soothing to apply essential oils to pressure points, like the wrists or behind the ears, or use oils to give themselves a light self-massage. (Massage for–or from–your bed partners work great, too!) Essential oils in undiluted form are highly concentrated and intense, and can irritate your skin. DO NOT APPLY undiluted essential oil to your skin. If you’re planning to use essential oils topically on your body, be sure you’re buying an already diluted oil—a mixture of the fragrant essential oil of your choice and a carrier oil (often a vegetable oil).
LAVENDER. This is the most popular essential oil for sleep and relaxation among my patients, and my first, general go-to recommendation for people looking to try aromatherapy for sleep. Lavender is a soothing scent that’s long been associated with relaxation and sleep, and used as a natural remedy for anxiety. Lavender is probably the most rigorously studied essential oil. A robust body of research shows lavender has anxiety reducing—or anxiolytic—effects, as well as beneficial effects on depression. Lavender can also help with pain relief, several studies show. One recent study showed aromatherapy using lavender oil reduced the need for pain medications in a group of 6 to 12-year-old children recovering from having their tonsils removed. Lavender also has sedative effects, meaning it can work directly to help you fall asleep. A number of studies point to lavender’s effectiveness for sleep: improving sleep quality, increasing sleep amounts, and elevating daytime alertness, including in people with insomnia.
Some essential oils have sedative properties, which can be helpful for people who are having trouble falling asleep or sleeping through the night. Lavender oil, in particular, is known to be an effective sleep aid because of its ability to leave you feeling relaxed and calm. Some other oils that can be used to promote restful sleep include Roman chamomile, ylang ylang, bergamot and vetiver.

RC and Raven (YL Blends) are a few that I have used for myself and family for breathing issues. And Digize (also a Young Living Blend) is excellent for digestion, acid, and upset. Peppermint and Fennel are also options to look into. As far as best brand, you will have to do your research. I have been very happy with Young Living, but I know many will find the “best” from various sources to make up their essential oil cabinet. You will not want to use a vaporizer for your oils, I would suggest purchasing a diffuser which is designed to disperse your oils, over time essential oils will breakdown plastic tubing. A search on Amazon or Abundanthealth.com is a place to start looking at diffusers. You can also get a free one in premium kits sold by Young Living. Please feel free to contact me.
Some essential massage oils may make their way into the placenta, an organ in your uterus that grows along with your baby and helps to nourish it. It’s not clear if this causes any problems, unless you take toxic amounts, but to be safe, it’s best to avoid certain oils if you’re pregnant. Those include wormwood, rue, oak moss, Lavandula stoechas, camphor, parsley seed, sage, and hyssop. Ask your doctor if you’re unsure.

I did a price comparison from various oil companies, including doTerra and Mountain Rose Herbs. The price differences seem to focus primarily on country of origin, followed by whether they were fair trade. doTerra, for example, sells Frankincense from Oman, and the wholesale price for 15ml is almost $70. Mountain Rose sells USA Frankincense at $20 for 15ml. Eden Botanical sells Frankincense from Somalia at $16 for 15ml. Scents of Earth sells Frankincense from Oman at $45 for 10 ml (or $67.50 for 15 ml).
I’m so glad I found this site when I googled “oils comparable to young living.” I have been using Young Living oils for a few months now, but can’t keep up with the prices. I absolutely love and believe that essential oils help me sleep better, relieve my headaches and improve my life! I have bookmarked your page so I can frequently refer to it. Thank you for putting the time into researching each of these brands and building this site (beautifully done!).

I am still confused about this whole internal taking thing. how can several companies say their eos are 100% and yet some be safe to take internally and others not. also, I have been using NOW eos for a couple of years. you state that they are ok for cleaning but not for therapeutic reasons. can you explain this further? they say they are 100% pure and they seem to be working. would these other companies eos work better or differently? thanks
Lavender essential oil is one of the most popular and well known oils in the world. This oil has countless uses and benefits for every situation! Also referred to as Lavandula Angustifolia, Lavender originated in Bulgaria and is extracted through the flowering tops of Lavender plants. The sweet, flowery, and herb-filled scent of this oil is a favorite for everyone. Lavender essential oil offers many therapeutic benefits, the scent alone can create a sense of peace and tranquility. You can also diffuse lavender at bedtime to encourage a relaxing and restful nights sleep. This oil is also the perfect addition to any lotion or carrier to help soothe the skin and mind. Give this essential oil a try and you'll be able to see why is is so popular!
What would be more accurate is that the more “pure” the oil is the more caution you should use in internal dose (“consumption”) – which is one of the least effective ways to use essential oils because they are broken down by the liver before absorption into the blood stream. If an oil is closer to a synthetic flavoring, like that used in chewing gum, then it would be deemed safer for consumption. I assume what YL sells as pure for use in consumption is similar to pure synthetic flavoring.
Be precautious of suppliers that promote their essential oils as being "therapeutic grade" or "aromatherapy grade." There is no governmental regulating body that grades or certifies essential oils as "therapeutic grade" or "aromatherapy grade." (For more information, read the "Therapeutic Grade" and "Aromatherapy Grade" Essential Oils article.) Not all companies use these terms with any form of deception in mind, but some do. Therefore, it's important to understand the background behind this terminology and evaluate these suppliers based on other factors and the tips shown below.
×