I think everyone should check out NYROrganic because it truly is the MOST ethical company I have discovered. It has had a thriving store in covenant gardens in the UK for over 30 years. They own their own farms and distilleries. It is a family owned and operated company with all organic herbs and plants. The prices are the most reasonable I have seen for it’s quality. They brought it to the US 3 years ago as a direct sales company and because of the European standards vs the US standards or lack there of I have 110% trust in the products. I am not here to argue but just a suggestion to check it out.
After much internet research I found that high doses of magnesium helped. I currently take 1 tablespoon of “Calm” magnesium powder diluted in a cup of warm water every night before bed. Magnesium also helps with sleep. The magnesium has not been a cure all for me. I’ve also been going to an acupuncturist for the past 5 months which has also helped greatly but I still get the night cramps occasionally which is very upsetting. I’ve also found that caffeine and alcohol make matters worse so be careful with consumption of both.
The main reason I will not buy essential oils from any of the MLM companies is because they lead their customers to believe that when they say their product is “Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade”, that means something of value in the essential oil and aromatherapy world. There were three shocking things that I learned to lead me to steer clear of these
There are quite a few factors to keep in mind to figure out whether you're looking at a quality essential oil. Serena Goldstein, N.D., recommends doing your research on a company's own website before pulling the trigger on a purchase. It's a good sign when a company is forthcoming about where their materials come from and have independent studies conducted on their oils. Make sure the ingredient list only includes the oil itself and maybe a carrier oil, she says. And she cautions against third-party sellers on Amazon: "If something is significantly cheaper and it's through a third party, sometimes people might not always get exactly what they paid for," she says. Some sellers of essential oils have been known to add synthetic materials, vegetable oils, or cheaper, similar-smelling essential oils, without revealing the additives on their labels.
I have to give an honest review for this. I have spent one full week spending hours trying to search for the "best" essential oils to use especially that I am just a beginner. I read so much about the top brands like doTarra, and Young living etc, but also read great stuff about this brand which is not as popular. I decided to give it a try 4 things to mention

If you don't have access to a diffuser, you can reap the benefits of essential oils by getting a little creative. For example, if you want to get pumped for your stress-relieving workout, drop a cotton ball with peppermint essential oil into your gym bag. It will open up your airways for deep breathing, keep you alert and focused, and perk up your mood naturally, especially when combined with wild orange.


EXCELLENT BUY!! As a herbalist and soap maker, I use a variety of oils from various companies all over the world. The price for these was SO low that I thought, at the very least, I could use them for aroma therapy. They arrived in a beautifully designed box - professionally labeled and WOW was I STUNNED - the fragrance of each one showed very little difference from my finest oils that I have paid MUCH more for! As I am not a chemist - I cannot vouch for the percentages of each constituent, but I can tell you that the oils from the set that I have used thus far - have shown themselves to be just as effective as the high dollar bottle I have bought elsewhere! EXCELLENT Job - I sure hope they restock soon - I am buying MORE!
Anxiety is a very common problem and those who suffer from it are turning to essential oils, including me. Anxiety is constantly there. Any simple change in my daily schedule can cause stress and panic. Some days, I even have a hard time going to the grocery store because I am anxious about what that entails. For many people, simple tasks like shopping are easy and carefree, but for someone with anxiety, it can be very difficult.
Lisse essential oils purchases their products from distributors around the globe. Sourcing essential oils from foreign countries is common practice in today’s essential oil marketplace. It allows each plant to grow and flourish in its natural environment before it is harvested. Lavender originates in the Mediterranean, Myrrh is sourced best from the Middle East or Africa, and Sandalwood is originally from India. True essential oils have to come from their country of origin to be their most original variety. Lisse essential oils are 100% pure and routinely tested for quality. You can request test results on their website.
Add five to 10 drops of your preferred essential oil to your bath water to combat feelings of anxiety or stress. If your skin is sensitive, dilute the essential oil in 1 tablespoon of your preferred carrier oil before adding to the water, which will moisturize and protect your skin. Don’t add essential oils to running water as they will evaporate at a higher rate. Instead, add them once the tub is filled and just before getting in.

I have kept a personal inhaler of the Worry Free blend and another of Tranquil in my desk at work. I love Tranquil so much I now keep a bottle to diffuse in my office. I do find many of the oils mentioned helpful in times of stress or depression. Stopping to breathe and relax your muscles is important during those times, and I find oils encourage me to do that.
There are quite a few factors to keep in mind to figure out whether you're looking at a quality essential oil. Serena Goldstein, N.D., recommends doing your research on a company's own website before pulling the trigger on a purchase. It's a good sign when a company is forthcoming about where their materials come from and have independent studies conducted on their oils. Make sure the ingredient list only includes the oil itself and maybe a carrier oil, she says. And she cautions against third-party sellers on Amazon: "If something is significantly cheaper and it's through a third party, sometimes people might not always get exactly what they paid for," she says. Some sellers of essential oils have been known to add synthetic materials, vegetable oils, or cheaper, similar-smelling essential oils, without revealing the additives on their labels.
Thank you for this wonderful information! I have been inundated with the numerous brands of essential oils on the market. I have read reviews, but by far your information has helped me the most. I have been using oils for my Chronic pain & Neurosarcoidosis, always worried if the oils we’re harvested safely. This information will now allow me to make better decisions on my therapeutic treatment in the future! Thank you for your lengthy research!
Danika – you keep saying that “just because Young Living says it’s safe” – we’re not only learning that it’s safe from Young Living – MANY representatives for Young Living have taken it upon themselves to read and educate themselves extensively on the use of EO’s aromatically, topically and internally. Just because you believe that EO’s shouldn’t be used internally (due to your method of training) – doesn’t mean is wrong! For centuries EO’s were used aromatically, topically and INTERNALLY without harmful side effects. I do agree that a level of RESPONSIBILITY needs to used – as with any “medicinal product” – that goes without saying – but to literally sit there and accuse DoTerra or Young Living representatives of being un-educated or willingly harming people – you’re being very ignorant, cruel and narrow-minded.
For those coming to this blog from the UK (we seem to be a bit behind in the information stakes in the UK. most sites i come across are US based, and so places of purchase and some terminology is non applicable for us), a good ethical and organic place to buy your oils is from G Baldwins (based in London). they don’t have as big a range in oils as you might want or find elsewhere, but after reading reviews and doing some research on other oil providing companies (and it is a minefield: hard to be assured of the authenticity) they came out best for me.
The Ananda Apothecary may be a slightly lesser-known name and strangely hard to pronounce. However, it’s a company of true essential oils people where you can buy almost any type and variety of essential oil you can imagine. Most importantly, they offer wild crafted essential oils, which are oils made from wild harvested plant materials and not plants grown on farms. You can also purchase organic oils certified by both the USDA and Ecocert ICO, and specially AGED essential oils. If all of these things are new to you, find more details in my full brand review here.
As we mentioned earlier, the FDA generally classifies essential oils as cosmetics, but they can also sometimes be considered drugs. In a quote direct from the US Food and Drug Administration website, “The law doesn’t require cosmetics to have FDA approval before they go on the market.” In addition, if a product claims to affect the health and function of the body, such as relieving anxiety, aiding digestion or calming sore muscles, the product must be approved by the FDA as a drug, which is a very long and costly process.
Wondering how those great smelling essential oils are made? Turns out, essential oils aren’t “made” at all. They ARE “extracted” from plants, herbs and spices. But just because they are extracted from plants doesn’t mean the way they’re sourced is all the same. In fact, the way they’re extracted from the plant or herb can have a big impact on the quality. Here’s a quick rundown of the two primary ways essential oils are extracted from the plants.
It’s very important to keep in mind that the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates essential oils mainly as cosmetics, NOT as therapeutic supplements, herbs or medications. So if you come across an essential oil company or salesperson who claims their oils can cure certain diseases or mental illnesses, they are violating federal law and can be prosecuted and fined by the US government.

“Organic” and “Wild Crafted” are just labels that have limited meanings when it comes to actual purity and therapeutic properties of the oil and sustainability of the source. Just because a plant is grown under organic conditions doesn’t mean that it’s pure or at therapeutic levels once its oil is put into a bottle. Organic only means the plant is grown without synthetic pesticides, chemical fertilizers, etc. The testing that most EO companies do only tests to ensure that certain required constituents are present in the oil and does not test for things that shouldn’t be there (ie weeds which can also be organic) or test that the constituents which are present are actually at therapeutic levels. That’s where it’s important to have 3rd party tests and that the results are certified (meaning that I can take that bottle of oil to a chemist and have it tested and it will be exactly what the company says it is and what I expect I paid for). Also the label “wild crafted” only means that the plant was grown in the wild. Again, it doesn’t ensure purity or potency of the oil. Also, being wild crafted doesn’t guarantee the oil comes from a plant that was sustainably grown and harvested. Many illegal cuttings are causing the extinction of plants in some regions. doTERRA’s certification of their oils to be 100% pure (nothing in them but the oil of the plant intended and no weeds organic or otherwise or anything else) and at therapeutic levels, backed up by 3rd party testing, means they put their reputation on the line that every bottle of their oils can be tested anywhere by anybody and what’s in the bottle will be exactly what they say it is; only what they say it is and at the therapeutic levels they say it is. So the question is, why do all other EO companies NOT certify their oils to be 100% pure and at therapeutic levels?


Tissue diffusion is a simple alternative to enjoying essential oils without a diffuser. Place 3-4 drops of the essential oil on a tissue and leave it near a vent or door. When the air conditioner turns on, or someone walks by, the movement of air will help to spread the essential oil. Soak other disposable materials such as wood in the oils to get the same effect.
The Young Living Speech you give is completely inaccurate and part of the genius marketing used by YL. Oils that have “do not consume” are protecting themselves from lawsuits, it’s a reasonable label statement. I am an educator at a major US University teaching essential oil studies. I have worked in production and quality control of essential oils.
The Essential Oil Company is your Aromatherapy essential oils source. We work directly with farmers and distillers of organic and conventional essential oils world wide. Suppliers of quality massage oils, perfume oils and fragrance oils. Purveyors of soapmaking supplies and incense supplies. Offering high-quality distillation equipment and distilling supplies for making your own essential oils and hydrosols.
Hi I like this post but I’m still confused so 100% essential oil is not to be ingested? The reason I’m asking this is I am wanting to make raw chocolates with peppermint oil a lady and she is not qualified at all she just works at a organic shop she told me that it’s fine to use the oil in very small amounts! Like peppermint and that’s just it i use 100% eucalyptus oil for cleaning my bathroom and it states on the bottle POISON!
Young Living ARE the best in my opinion, with their Seed to Seal standards and their Vitality line that are ingestible. I drink some in my water for tons of health benefits, I diffuse them, and use them topically too. So many benefits to using the Young Living brand. And a whole community of like minded people to learn from and make your own roller bottles and recipes with! Healing one drop at a time.
Be precautious of suppliers that promote their essential oils as being "therapeutic grade" or "aromatherapy grade." There is no governmental regulating body that grades or certifies essential oils as "therapeutic grade" or "aromatherapy grade." (For more information, read the "Therapeutic Grade" and "Aromatherapy Grade" Essential Oils article.) Not all companies use these terms with any form of deception in mind, but some do. Therefore, it's important to understand the background behind this terminology and evaluate these suppliers based on other factors and the tips shown below.
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