Posted in: Aromatherapy, Natural Healthy & Beauty | Tagged: aromatherapy, aromatherapy 101, best essential oil brans, Christina Anthis, environment, essential oils, green, Green cleaning, Hippie Homemaker, Hippy Homemaker, lavender oil, mlm essential oil scam, mlm essential oils, mlm scam, The Hippy Homemaker, therapeutic grade, therapeutic grade scam, which essential oils to buy

The oils from Marshalls you mentioned stated they are for aromatherapy. These are fragrance oils and probably NO T pure. That’s why they are so much cheaper 🙂 and they are just for enjoying the scent vs. therapeutic benefits. I would not recommend applying them to your skin in any way but the DoTerra oils you bought can be applied once mixed with coconut oil (fractionated will not harden in cool temps), sweet almond oil, argan oil or even olive oil. Any oil you choose should be labeled organic of course
An easy way to integrate aromatherapy into your everyday life is through diffusing. I turn to my diffuser for a multitude of reasons—when I want to set an ambience, reduce stress, support sleep, and increase alertness or motivation. Diffusion refers to a method of transmitting essential oils into the air within a specified area. Diffusing supports a multitude of goals, but it mainly serves two purposes: reducing air microbes and altering mood and emotion. Clinical research shows that diffused lemon essential oil is an affordable intervention that has a positive effect on test anxiety. Additionally, diffusing cinnamon, eucalyptus, and rosemary is an uplifting blend that also serves as a safe way to keep your home’s air germ-free.
The industry is peppered with suppliers that prey on the fact that many buyers may not know much about aromatherapy. Unfortunately, the industry lacks regulation, so many fall for marketing gimmicks, such as believing that terms like "therapeutic grade" and "certified pure" actually mean being held to a higher standard. Sadly, that's not always the case. Below are some brands that offer quality essential oils that give you the most bang for your buck:
According to the FDA, an essential oil only has to be 5% pure to label themselves as 100% pure. That’s why some say they are safe for internal use while others aren’t. The ones that say that you should not take them internally most likely have other things in them that make them unsafe for taking internally. For therapeutic reasons, and internal use, you should find a company that actually uses 100% pure oils. Also, undiluted essential oils do not expire. It’s the ones that have other contaminants in them that expire. If it has an expiration date or says you should not take any of their oils internally, those would be warning signs.

The new study, published in Frontiers in Behavioral Neuroscience, suggests that sniffing a compound in lavender—called linalool—affects the same parts of the brain as anti-anxiety drugs, only without impairing movement the way medicines like Valium can. Linalool was also found to affect the brain by smell alone, without being absorbed into the bloodstream—another potential plus for people worried about medication side effects or interactions.
How do you know which are the best essential oil brands? After all, this is an industry that isn’t regulated by the FDA. Oil quality can vary based on the distillation process. It also matters if the manufacturer dilutes the pure plant oil with bases or additives. But many of the most popular companies do rigorous testing to prove their oils’ purity.
A. While there are no extensive studies on the efficacy of aromatherapy, many small studies have indicated good results from various oils. Lavender, in particular, has been shown to have strong anti-anxiety and anti-insomnia effects. Tea tree oil is another essential oil with proven abilities to combat many types of skin infections and irritations.
Sadly there is a wide discrepancy in the quality that is reflected in the price. The less expensive brands I have ended up using for cleaning the house. Edens Garden oils smell like they are old and dirty. I love Young Living and yes, I have not tried DoTerra. Only because there selection was so limited and I felt there wouldn’t be much differenance between them and Young Living.
I have done the smell test with my oils along with some friends oils and what I found was that it was a HUGE difference in smell. I would smell my NOW oil or my Aura Cacia oil and I would feel like they smelled good and like they should, then I would smell my doTerra oils and feel the same way… the wierd part is that when I smelled the other oil again I could smell that it was a little off. The other oil smelled either a little stale, watered down, almost rancid, or in the case of lavender almost like another species of plant (this can happen from being grown in a different area of the world with different soil constituents). By far doTerra won my personal smell test from all the oil companies, however I do have two others that I personally would use for therapeutic purposes and not be afraid of either external or internal use (only the oils from the GRAS EO list for internal use of course).
I have bought dozens of essential oils from Piping Rock. Their prices are simply the best, especially considering the free shipping and “Crazy Deals” they offer and change almost daily. You can get 15 ml of 100% neroli oil for about $15, and it’s lovely! They also have a 15 ml bottle of 100% West Indian sandalwood for $39.95, and it smells GREAT. A 15 ml bottle of 100% pure cistus oil is about $13 or $14. It can’t be beat! Many of the normally cheaper oils (peppermint, orange, cedarwood, tangerine, tea tree, pine etc.) are wonderfully priced too -almost a steal. Their rose, jasmine and tuberose blends did not disappoint scent-wise (they weren’t too weak at all). Their oils come in glass bottles with stoppers and pretty labels. I was scared at first because of how cheap their prices are, but I’m glad I took the chance. On top of the great products, they ship SUPER FAST, package well, and my orders are always complete and correct. So happy with this company. Lastly, by signing up with the http://www.mrrebates.com website (it’s free), and accessing piping rock from there, you will get a %10 discount on your purchase, which you eventually receive as a refund in cash that you can have added to your PayPal account. I’ve earned over $50 in refunds! I’ve seen this % go up and down by a little from time to time, but the average is 10% (which it is as of today, 5/8/14). Maybe wait for a “free shipping day” and try some of the cheaper oils to test the waters first. Even when you have to pay for shipping (for orders under $40), the shipping is a flat $3.95 rate!
The Young Living Speech you give is completely inaccurate and part of the genius marketing used by YL. Oils that have “do not consume” are protecting themselves from lawsuits, it’s a reasonable label statement. I am an educator at a major US University teaching essential oil studies. I have worked in production and quality control of essential oils.
It's understandable for those new to aromatherapy to want every essential oil. But it takes time to build your own apothecary and connect with different scents. If you are looking to get started, I suggest buying three common, well-priced, and effective essential oils with few safety concerns: lavender, tea tree, and sweet orange. Buy a diffuser and use it. Diffusing is an incredibly economical use of oils that allows you to use them every day while not being overwhelmed with learning curves for safety with topical application and DIY product formulation. Additionally, aromatherapy has many uses—health, skin care, cleaning, etc. So, it's important to align the quality of oils with your needs. For instance, I use well-researched, high-quality oils on my face but am less rigid when choosing oils to include in DIY house-cleaning products. And if you're into aromatherapy for skin care, start with hydrosols. Hydrosols are the water-based by-product of the distillation process, but they are much gentler and cheaper than essential oils.
Thanks to these attributes, many of these ingredients are able to fight off a wide range of viruses, infections, and pathogens. Using these kinds of oils is often a natural and safer way to combat illness and keep the body healthy – particularly over long periods of time. This could prove to be especially beneficial for those suffering with long-term or chronic disorders.
We've covered a lot about aiding mood and mentality, but what about the more physical healing benefits of essential oils? Many plants are natural antiseptics, anti-inflammatories, antimicrobials, and antivirals, so when concentrated into essential oil form, they can function as highly effective remedies for acne, muscle soreness, sore throats, and more. Take ever-versatile peppermint oil, for example. "It's cooling, and can be found in formulated muscle care products along with eucalyptus, wintergreen, and German chamomile essential oils to name a few," Avery says. Try her go-to recipe for a DIY leg rub: "Add 10 drops of peppermint essential oil to one ounce of sweet almond oil, and rub it into leg muscles and feet."
This is a general summary for people who are using essential oils on a casual basis. 🙂 I didn’t want to muddy the waters here. However, I would gladly revise my statement if the oils were taken internally under the care of a naturopath or other professional. I just don’t think people should, willy nilly, run around taking them internally, due to their potency.
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