Topical use: Another effective way to use essential oils is topical application, since essential oils easily penetrate the skin. Once absorbed, they stay in the areas where applied. While essential oils are easily absorbed, using a light massage motion can help increase the blood flow to the area in which essential oils are applied. Likewise, using a carrier oil can also help increase essential oil absorption, especially for dry or flaky skin.

Lemon is a versatile essential oil used to promote and cleanse the body and the digestive tract, encourages a positive mood, and for relief from the symptoms of a cough or a cold. Used topically, this oil is a forceful cleansing agent. Used internally, Lemon supports respiratory functions, relief from seasonal coughs and colds, and promotes healthy digestion. Used aromatically, this essential oil fills the air will an invigorating, fresh, citrus scent that is uplifting and encourages a positive mood.
Much of this statement is quite misleading and not very well researched. There are a few marketers of EO that have actual farms where the plants are grown and harvested…some may even distil their own oils. There is only one producer of EO that controls the entire process from beginning to market. There is one large co. that claims to be pure and has been proven in court to have been making false statements and claims of purity. There are several companies that own no land and only a building where they do the paperwork and perhaps receive and reship their products because they source it all from someone else.
Cinnamon and ginger are a great combination, right? They are a great combination of two spices, and they are a great combination of two oils. You may be surprised at the third oil we will recommend adding to the mix, however. It’s orange oil! Orange oil is great, but would you have guessed to add it to cinnamon oil and ginger oil? Among other benefits, this combination of the best essential oils for diffusers is reportedly great to use to provide a cozy wintertime atmosphere.

Ylang Ylang has a romantic, flora aroma that consists of several components, including benzyl acetate, benzyl benzoate linalool, caryophyllene, among many others. It can be used to treat anxiety and depression because it has an uplifting effect. A 2006 study in the journal Taehan Kanho Hakhoe Chi found ylang ylang oil in combination with bergamot and lavender could reduce “psychological stress responses and serum cortisol levels, as well as the blood pressure of clients with essential hypertension" by taking it once a day in four weeks.
You might think peppermint oil is an excellent breath freshener, but it certainly does a lot more than that!  Peppermint oil contains menthol, a natural anesthetic that gives an amazing, cooling sensation (think of the refreshing taste of peppermint gum). An important point to note is that peppermint oil is a lot more concentrated than most essential oils so it is best used when diluted with a carrier oil such as fractionated coconut oil, jojoba oil or sweet almond oil. 

Allelopathy occurs when a plant releases chemicals to prevent competing vegetation from growing within its area or zone. An often-cited example is in southern California, home to the dominant shrubs Salvia leucophylla (sage bush) and Artemisia californica (a type of sage). Both species release allelopathic terpenoids, eucalyptol and camphor, into the surrounding area, which effectively prevents other plant species from growing around them. This is allelopathy. Chemicals that deter competing growth (terpenes, for example) are referred to as allelochemics.


Natural oils can also be used to treat headaches too – and this is because they work to tackle one of the main sources of these types of issues (often muscle tightness as a result of stress or exertion). In fact, these liquids have often proven to be better than painkillers for many individuals suffering with a range of headaches – in both those who suffer sporadically, and chronically.
In fact, Améo is the only company endorsed by Dr. Daniel Pénoél, a world renown doctor working in the field of aromatherapy since 1977, with an international reputation as an essential oil researcher, aromatic medicine practitioner, educator, and author. Essential Oils is a Trillion $ industry so there is lots of motivation for better health and wellness. I figure if people throughout the world are spending that kind of money they it MUST REALLY work. You can check it out here: http://www.gnnamerica.com/brand-new-ameo-essential-oils-all-oils-are-not-created-equal-you-dont-want-to-miss-this/

If you pass through the natural health aisles of your local grocery store, you’re likely to see small glass bottles of curious liquids with poignant aromas that could fill a room. Scents like lavender, eucalyptus, tea tree oil and orange line the shelves next to oil blends with promising labels like Anxiety Release, Detoxification Aide, Energize, Immune Support, Meditative Mood, and more. While some modern shoppers may be speculative of these products, ancient homemade versions of these single note essential oils and essential oil blends have been used for nearly 6,000 years for everything from traditional medical practices to spiritual rituals.

On the bright side, dōTERRA sources their essential oils from growers across the globe who use a distillation process of low-heat steam distillation or cold extraction for select essential oils. Their global botanical network encompasses farmers and distillers in 40 different countries. dōTERRA offers full insight into the consumer journey from essential oil sourcing to delivering the bottle to a consumers’ hand, on their website Source to You. GC/MS quality reports are also available for download on this website.


I was just barely speaking with a girl who is a certified aromatherapist and she said that people need to be very careful with wintergreen because it is such a strong blood thinner. I think this may be part of why it specifically is deemed unsafe for internal use (whether its pure or not). When it says wintergreen oil on ingredients lists I’m willing to bet it is a synthetically created oil or other form of it rather than the essential oil because of its therapeutic properties.
The statements contained herein have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Neither Rocky Mountain Oils nor its products are intended for the purpose of diagnosing, treating, curing, or preventing any disease. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your physician before using these products.
Hi Crunchy Betty, I love your blog and recently bought a whole bunch of carrier oils along with Lavender 40/42 essential oil . I didn’t realise this wasn’t the same as Lavender essential oil and used it (diluted with jojoba oil) on my face – the next morning I had tiny bumps all over my face which were red and very itchy, with slight swelling! Do you know what the difference between these two different oils are, and if the 40/42 is more dangerous to use than the other?  
I stumbled on this page and have found it really useful. Just wonder if you could help – I’m thinking of making some homemade lotion bars made with beeswax, shea butter and coconut oil. I’d like to use Sweet Orange essential oil for a Christmassy smell, how many drops would be safe to use? I have found one recipe which uses 50 drops of lavendar (where the recipe uses around 1cup of each of the ingredients), would I be able to use this amount of the orange?
There have been many human clinical studies testing the effects of essential oils on healthy subjects.(15) The potential health benefits of essential oils are vast. Many essential oils have antioxidant properties.(16) The results of six studies examining the effects of aromatherapy on depression showed positive effects.(17) Other studies also suggest that essential oils, such as tea tree, lavender, cinnamon, basil or rosemary, may resist microbes and inhibit the growth of strains of E. coli – another promising area of research.(18)
I think it’s wonderful that you’re starting somewhere. I used the NOW brand for several years with great results. I’ve recently discovered Young Living and WOW way different. I’ve found that the brands in our local stores are cut with carriers and preservatives. Young Living is completely pure. I mean a small bottle of sandalwood from NOW costs about $15. Young Living’s cost well over $100. The difference is that YL offers completely pure oils. A closer look at my NOW sandalwood bottle showed that it was in a carrier oil. I prefer to buy my own carriers and mix my favorite oils into them on my own. Wishing you continued success!
In fact, Améo is the only company endorsed by Dr. Daniel Pénoél, a world renown doctor working in the field of aromatherapy since 1977, with an international reputation as an essential oil researcher, aromatic medicine practitioner, educator, and author. Essential Oils is a Trillion $ industry so there is lots of motivation for better health and wellness. I figure if people throughout the world are spending that kind of money they it MUST REALLY work. You can check it out here: http://www.gnnamerica.com/brand-new-ameo-essential-oils-all-oils-are-not-created-equal-you-dont-want-to-miss-this/
Do they sell essential oils of plants that are endangered? There are quite a few companies that are harvesting and using essential oils of plants that are endangered. You should be asking where your essential oil has come from; is it “endangered” and is the supplier trying to sell you an inferior/substituted product in its place, claiming that it is the same “quality” and standard.  If it is extracted from an endangered plant species, what is the current level of threat to that plant species? Finally, is there an alternative essential oil, with similar chemical components and properties that you could be using? You can keep track of current endangered aromatic species on cropwatch.org
The use of essential oils for medicinal purposes has an ancient history, going back to early Egyptian, Chinese, and Roman societies. Ever hear of the Hippocratic Oath? That’s the ethical pledge taken by physicians for centuries (now, often taken by students upon graduation from medical school). It’s named for Greek physician, Hippocrates, who studied the effects of essential oils and was a proponent of their healing, health-promoting properties.
I am trying to make up my own mixture of Deep Blue for my cousin who is 70 years old, and who is not on any type of medication as well as for a lady who is 80 after they suffered from a nasty bout of a virus from a mosquito in the caribbean which cause inflammation and joint pains – I have bought all the ingredients, including wintergreen, which you said is poisonous – could you tell me the dosage of the different oils being used namely wintergreen, camphor; peppermint; blue tansy; german chamomile; helichrysum and osmanthus – in the synergistic mix – how many drops of all these oils to make up the mix? I will make up the mix and the post it in a 10 ml bottle to my cousin with specific instructions. I should appreciate your advise.

Thank you Holly! I’m happy to see someone stand up and clarify the fact that doTerra does stand behind their oils. To state such a statement of an oil to 100% certified pure therapeutic grade does mean something….especially is you consider using them internally or for cooking. If you are considering using essential oils instead of over the counter drugs, which contain many chemical ingredients (by the way, they use the same plants to create their drugs only they change them chemically and add other things), why not go all the way and eliminate ALL toxic and chemical additions to your body?? My suggestion, do your homework and research! Don’t take someone’s word for it in a comment. Buy a few bottles of the same oil (I hope you’ll consider doTerra) and compare how you feel.

I was just about to buy an assortment of EO's from a "best-seller" but I started reading the negative reviews first. I came across a reviewer who said that most of these companies that claim they sell 100% pure EO's are misleadingly claiming so. While I took that with a grain of salt (hey maybe it was a competitor review?) this person suggested watching a video on YouTube called "Scamazon". WOW did I learn a lot! The video is of an absolute expert in the field of EO's and who scientifically tests them for additives. He exposes several companies on Amazon that are making false claims about their products as well as a few reputable ones. Now from what I understand, having chemical additives isn't necessarily a bad thing but it depends on the application you are using it for. Sometimes an EO "fragrance" is perfectly ok. I am nebulizing mine and I also have pets so I really wanted pure oils.

Some oils can be applied directly to the skin, this is called using the oil “neat”. That does not mean to say that you shouldn’t dilute the oil in certain cases. Always dilute when applying to children and always check instructions from the company on how to apply the oil. Some need to be diluted to prevent skin irritation like peppermint. Those oils are considered “hot” and the irritation they cause is unpleasant to say the least. Research the oil before using and allow your body time to respond to each new oil before introducing a new one. Your body will tell you if you need more or less dilution with each oil If you give it enough time to respond.


Young Living – They can be pricey, but at the same time they do have a great quality oil and they have been around for many years. I personally like some of their non-oil purchases because there is a great selection. It’s cheaper if you sign up for a kit (and you can either send in a letter “resigning” as a distributor or let your account go inactive if you just want to buy a starter kit and get some of their oils at the discount for being a member. Or you can buy the individual oils… even better is to find a friend to buy individual oils from if you are not and/or do not want to sign up for them. If you’re interested in buying Young Living, my friend Dayna at Lemon Lime Adventures sells them.
Here are a few of the top-rated essential oil products on Amazon that may help relieve anxiety. If you’re thinking about giving them a try, be sure to loop in any other medical or mental-health professionals you’re currently seeing; they may be able to provide additional guidance or alert you to any potential side effects or interactions for which you could be at risk.
#3. EO’s if diluted properly (not neat) and ONLY certain EO’s are safe for children. Peppermint is not safe until at least 6 years of age, some say older, as it can be a mucous membrane irritant. Eucalyptus has a 1,8-cineole content, its not recommended for children until the age of 10. Very important for childrens safety to do due diligence…these are just a few that come to my mind right of way and why they aren’t safe for children. I know there is plenty of other oils that are safe for children diffused. Once older, then ok for application, diluted in carrier oil. I was told 2-10 years old is when you can start adding more EO’s to your child(ren) library, as they age, you can add more. Of course I know this is hugely a hot topic. It depends on who you ask when you can introduce EO’s to babies and children. I know the MLM say put them neat on babies feet. No ones feet (bottom) will absorb EO’s as we have glands on the bottom of our feet, not pores to absorb the EO’s.
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