Florasol is another solvent used to obtain essential oils. It was originally developed as a refrigerant to replace Freon. Although Florasol is an "ozone-friendly" product, it has a high global warming potential (GWP; 100-yr GWP = 1430).[11] The European Union has banned its use, with a phase-out process that began in 2011, to be completed in 2017.[12] One advantage of Florasol is that the extraction of essential oils occurs at or below room temperature so degradation through high temperature extremes does not occur. The essential oils are mostly pure and contain little to no foreign substances.[citation needed]
When shopping for essential oils, watch out for words such as “fragrance oil,” “nature identical oil,” or “perfume oil.” These words indicate that what you see is not a pure, single essential oil. I've seen companies label fragrance oils (that can be combinations of essential oils and chemicals or just plain chemicals) and perfume oils as being suitable for aromatherapy. This is a tipoff that the vendor knows little about aromatherapy. Countless vendors of strictly fragrance oils have written me to ask for advertising of their “aromatherapy oils" (I don't accept such advertising). Beginners need to watch out for retailers/suppliers who inaccurately use the term aromatherapy for their own sales gain.
Do not take any oils internally and do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin without advanced essential oil knowledge or consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children. It is safest to consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using oils with children. For in-depth information on oil safety issues, read Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young.
LAVENDER. This is the most popular essential oil for sleep and relaxation among my patients, and my first, general go-to recommendation for people looking to try aromatherapy for sleep. Lavender is a soothing scent that’s long been associated with relaxation and sleep, and used as a natural remedy for anxiety. Lavender is probably the most rigorously studied essential oil. A robust body of research shows lavender has anxiety reducing—or anxiolytic—effects, as well as beneficial effects on depression. Lavender can also help with pain relief, several studies show. One recent study showed aromatherapy using lavender oil reduced the need for pain medications in a group of 6 to 12-year-old children recovering from having their tonsils removed. Lavender also has sedative effects, meaning it can work directly to help you fall asleep. A number of studies point to lavender’s effectiveness for sleep: improving sleep quality, increasing sleep amounts, and elevating daytime alertness, including in people with insomnia.
Orange essential oil smells just like, you guessed it, a fresh, tart, orange. With a powerful, uplifting aroma, orange oil has proven benefits for creating feelings of happiness that can improve energy levels. A study conducted at Mei University in Japan documented that when administered orange oil, patients were radically able to reduce the amount of antidepressant medications they were on.
Thank you so much for this invaluable article – you put so much time into this and it’s greatly appreciated! I recently reviewed how much I spent with YL and am actually embarrassed that I fell for it without researching. Not that I don’t appreciate the products but well, they are just way too expensive and as someone else mentioned, high sales tax.
Inhalation is the most common method of using essential oils and the basis of aromatherapy. You can sniff the oils directly from the bottle or pour a few drops into a diffuser, which spreads the fragrance over a large area. You can even wet a cotton ball with essential oil, and then set the fragrant cotton near you or in any area you want fragranced.
Health.com is part of the Meredith Health Group. All rights reserved. The material in this site is intended to be of general informational use and is not intended to constitute medical advice, probable diagnosis, or recommended treatments. All products and services featured are selected by our editors. Health.com may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. See the Terms of Servicethis link opens in a new tab and Privacy Policythis link opens in a new tab (Your California Rightsthis link opens in a new tab)for more information. Ad Choicesthis link opens in a new tab | EU Data Subject Requeststhis link opens in a new tab

Hi. I have been using DoTERRA’s products for approx. 6 months in many ways, topically, diffuser, cleaning, cooking, etc. I recently had surgery and got a bad cold while in the hospital. I started using doTERRA’s OnGuard throat drops and continually got worse (I also suffer from asthma so was using my inhalers as well.). Do you think there is any way the drops killed too much of the good bacteria in my mouth and throat? Just wondering your thoughts on this. Looking forward to your feedback.


I really like DoTerra brand essential oils. I have many of them and find them high quality. All essential oils that are sold are in business. Whether it’s MLM or not. I don’t have a problem with that at all (but maybe it’s just me). Young Living was once considered by many to be the “best” but now that DoTerra’s been on the market (I don’t know, maybe five years or so?) they have competition. Apparently people from Young Living (I’m not sure if that’s the name) broke away and started DoTerra. In any case, if it’s purity and therapeutic grade I personally think both are good companies. Some like DoTerra more so that’s what got me started on them. 

Lavender is so powerful for treating anxiety in essential oil form, in fact, that it is currently approved for use as an anxiolytic in Germany under the name Lasea. In a survey paper on Lavender and the nervous system published in 2013 researchers stated that “there is growing evidence suggesting that lavender oil may be an effective medicament in treatment of several neurological disorders.” [12,13]
This blend of eight oils earned the Amazon’s Choice designation after garnering over 3,800 glowing reviews. It’s a smart choice for insomniacs who want to address all the possible causes of their tossing and turning, like anxiety that keeps them up and pain that wakes them up. The bottle contains sleepy time standbys like chamomile and lavender, but other oils like clary sage, sweet marjoram, and sandalwood round out the mix for an earthier vibe.
Thank you for sharing your knowledge! I am 36 weeks pregnant and came down with a nasty cough. I couldn’t take any medicine, but yet couldn’t sleep. I used eucalyptus oil on my neck and chest to clear up my cough. I read that eucalyptus oil is not advised for pregnant women to use, however, I could not find any reasons why. Do you happen to know the risks that eucalyptus oil might have on the unborn baby? I have since stopped using the oil, but definitely used it a few times. (I will be calling my doctor, but was curious about your input.) Thank you so much!
Aromatherapy is quite popular these days, and it is one way to use many of the essential oils out there. When looking at the best essential oils for diffusers, it is important to note the individual benefits they provide. You can visit an alternative health practitioner, or you can buy your own diffuser and oils for home use. Here we discuss some of the most popular essential organic oils for aromatherapy.
Five double-blinded and randomized controlled trials using either placebo or active controls were identified that are summarized in the Table.50-54 All trials were conducted in Germany, had a duration of 6 to 10 weeks, and used the oral standardized lavender oil preparation SLO. Studies were conducted in an outpatient setting and were generally mixed between psychiatric and primary care practices. Some major strengths of the studies were adequate power to detect differences in treatments, use of both intention-to-treat and per protocol analysis sets, and prohibition of concomitant anxiolytic medications or psychotherapy during the study period. Participants were predominantly female (66%-77%), an average age of 45 to 49 years, white, and had a moderate to severe anxiety according to baseline Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAMA) scores. Psychiatric and neurologic comorbidities were generally excluded, including personality disorders, substance use disorders, and suicidality. Varying degrees of depressive symptoms were allowed, although this was study dependent. In all trials SLO was found to be efficacious in reducing HAMA scores (Table) and was well tolerated, with gastrointestinal side effects being the most commonly reported side effect.
I bought frontier brand cinnamon flavoring at a health food store. Is this cinnamon considered an essential oil? It says to use a few drops in baking cookies, cakes and other recipes, or 2 Tbsp. in a quart in a quart of simmering water with cloves and cinnamon sticks for relaxation. I have been using 1/4tsp. to 1/2tsp and sometimes more several times a day on cereals, tea and other foods thinking it might help control my blood sugar which was edging up in the pre-diabetes range. Is it safe to be consuming this much (organic sunflower oil and organic cinnamon oil are the 2 ingredients listed on bottle) in this manner?
While I’m all about individual empowerment and autonomy, let’s consider this in a different light. Would we accept this model for any other type of medical/pharmaceutical sales? If I wanted to start a multi-level marketing company selling antibiotics for children and then allow anyone to sign up, sell and distribute to anyone that wanted my products, would that be okay? Beyond okay, would it be celebrated the same way that essential oils are? No, it wouldn’t. Most people would say that distributors selling antibiotics without any training, education, or regulation would be irresponsible. Yet, essential oils claim to be natural antibiotics all the time. It’s a double-standard.

One of the best parts about shopping on Amazon is the insane selection, and searching for "essential oils" on the mega-site will return more than 100,000 results. But that also means a wide range in quality, especially because the way in which essential oils are made greatly affects their potency and purity. If your goal is to buy essential oil on Amazon without sacrificing quality, keep scrolling for expert tips and product recommendations that are worth your money.
What does this trio of essential oils do for you? You may count on them to combine to give you the mental clarity you need for that big final exam, for instance. Just add some drops of peppermint, rosemary and cinnamon oil to your diffuser, and get to studying before that test. It’s not just for taking exams though, as it’s good for clarity and focus on any job you need to get done.
No one can deny that the scent of a rose is calming and that the sight of one is incredibly romantic. And here’s how to grow your own roses. Now,  imagine experiencing rose in its most potent form, AKA rose essential oil. Researchers have uncovered countless benefits of using rose oil, from clearing up skin blemishes and breakouts to reducing anxiety and depression. One study published in the Journal of Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice set out to determine the depression-improving abilities of rose oil by analyzing a group of 28 postpartum women and treating half of them with 15-minute lavender-rose infused aromatherapy session. The other half served as the control group. The group who received the aromatherapy treatment experienced significantly lower postnatal depression scores as well as lower scores for general anxiety disorder. Check out the amazing health benefits of aromatherapy.
The Journal of Health Resources reported that jasmine aromatherapy essential oil has a positive effect on the nervous system. Researchers found that the effect of jasmine essential oil on humans helped boost positive feelings and at the same time alleviate drowsiness. The researchers concluded that jasmine essential oil boosts mood states and stimulates the function of the nervous system. (18)

Hey! Thanks for your comment. I do use and enjoy many products from YL but fell off with ordering auto ship with them. They have so many great products like cleaning supplies that I use all the time that last FOREVER so I haven’t needed to place as many orders with them. I love Valor and I hope Isagenix considers coming out with something similar. It has many amazing uses. In our home I’ve diffused it at night so I can sleep because my husband has a snoring problem and I clench my teeth at night. I’ve noticed an amazing difference when I apply it topically and also diffuse it at night. Total game changer- try it if you haven’t! As for the shakes, I’m not familiar with YL’s shakes but it looks like the protein in YL is an isolate. I really like Isagenix’s shakes and have taken them for over a year. The ingredients are pure, and there are lots of vitamins and minerals. Isagenix uses a whey protein concentrate which means it is more bio available, rather than an isolate where some nutrients and vitamins have been lost. I really care about the quality of the protein because my entire family uses it. I’ve been loving Isagenix for awhile now and it made perfect sense to order these awesome oils from the same company that gives me such great quality shakes!

Frankincense, also known as "olibanum" is an aromatic resin that can be used to treat depression and anxiety due to its calming effect. A 2008 study in the journal Taehan Kanho Hakhoe Chi found this oil mixed with bergamot and lavender had a positive effect on pain and depression in hospice patients with terminal cancer. A simple aroma hand massage had a healing effect when essential oils were used.


Quality Standards & Control: Proprietary “Seed to Seal®” production process. Subjected to strict requirements set forth in the CPTG Certified Pure Therapeutic Grade® quality protocol. “Source to You” production process. Third-party tested and all test results are fully disclosed on their website. GC/MS Testing, plus their proprietary S.A.A.F.E. Promise™. E.D.E.N.S Guarantee.
Resins and complex combinations of terpenes are released by some plants and trees, such as evergreens, to act as antimicrobial, antifungal, and antibacterial agents against a wide range of organisms that may threaten the survival of the plants. Compounds such as sesquiterpene lactones found in plants such as feverfew, yarrow, and blessed thistle, have been found to play a strong antimicrobial role as well as a protective role from herbivores.
Bath: Avoid dripping your essential oil directly into the bath water; you always want to mix it first with a natural emulsifier like honey, milk, a carrier oil, or even sea salt. Doing this will help emulsify and disperse the essential oils into the water. If you don’t do this, the oils will simply sit on the surface of the water and come into direct contact with your skin, possibly causing burns and dermal toxicity.
I’ve read the other blog about homemade deodorant and im looking to give it a shot. recently ive had painful reactions to deodorant and antiperspirant (all types and brands, even natural or organic like toms and green beaver) so im trying to get down to fewer and fewer ingredients. i have some essential tea tree oil and mixed it with some coconut oil but i still stink 🙁 . Im looking for an oil that i can use that will be strong but relatively “neutral” in smell ( im a guy so im not too interested in smelling like lavender), but it has to be able to be put on my skin without any reactions. Anyone have any suggestions?
There are many popular, quality essential oils, including those that are Certified USDA Organic, therapeutic grade and 100% pure—with no fillers, bases or additives. For example, being Certified USDA Organic is important for some people because the organic certification can be traced back clear to the seed and plant. Every handler of the product must be certified as well. Additionally, no prohibited pesticides or other toxins are used for Certified USDA Organic products.
All information on The Hippy Homemaker is meant for educational and informational purposes only. The statements on this website have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Products and/or information are not intended to diagnose, cure, treat, or prevent any disease. Readers are advised to do their own research and make decisions in partnership with their health care provider. If you are pregnant, nursing, have a medical condition or are taking any medication, please consult your physician.
Horrible burn from acupuncture and essential oils followed by tanning. No one told me essential oils can be photo activated up have a horrible disfiguring burn on the backs of my knees my feet and my chest where I had acupuncture and essential oils DO NOT TAN AFTER ESSENTIAL OIL USE! If I could upload photos I would it’s horrible I have a huge blister on my foot
Young Living oils are therapeutic grade and some of them can be applied neat but many recommend at least a 1:1 with a carrier. Always research the oils and know how to dilute them but also understand that your body may tell you that 1:4 peppermint is too diluted and isn’t giving you the best benefits. Each person responds to oils differently and should allow their body time to respond to the oil. If after an extended time – YL recommends at least 25 minutes for their oils – you haven’t noticed any affect attempt the oil again with less dilution. Keep track of your responses to each oil and base your use on the notes you have taken.
Its important to note that these products are not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), are not thoroughly tested or regulated, and there is little research evidence to support their effectiveness for social anxiety and other mental health conditions. In addition, since these products are not regulated, there is no guarantee regarding safety or ingredients.
To help us get a more clear understanding of what to look for in essential oils we spoke with Clinical Registered Aromatherapist, Anna Doxie. She is the founder of the Institute of Holistic Phyto-Aromatherapy. She’s the Director Coordinator and Director of the Southern California Region of the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA) and an esteemed Aromatherapy instructor. We’ve also combed through NAHA’s educational materials, consulted the prolific writings of Dr. Robert Pappas — a highly respected name in essential oil testing and education — and sought many other independent sources of information to present to you some guidelines for finding the best essential oil:
I used lavender essential oil with water as a body spray- it turns out THAT was what my skin reacted to– I thought I had hives on my chest, but it didn’t go away. Fortunately, since I had replaced my toiletry items with natural/homemade, it was easy to determine the lavender as the cause by process of elimination. That has to be the biggest reason to go natural– especially if your skin is sensitive…it allows you to personalize and customize while ensuring that you know every particle of what you are using 🙂 Thanks for everything!
×