Vetiver is another oil that’s been used in traditional medicine for thousands of years, appreciated for its soothing, healing, and protective qualities. Its number one benefit, however, is its antioxidant properties, known to fight free radicals and keep toxins and environmental pollutants out of the body. One study, by the Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition at Clemson University in South Carolina, found vetiver oil to have one of the strongest “free radical scavenging” abilities when compared to other popular antioxidants. That’s one reason it’s used so commonly in aromatherapy sessions. Another impressive benefit of vetiver oil is its ability to reduce anxiety. One study published by Srinakharinwirot University in Bangkok, Thailand, found that, when given to rats, vetiver oil had the same impact as Diazepam, a medication that treats anxiety. More recent research has even linked vetiver oil to treating ADHD and ADD, which is increasingly common in adults as well as children.

The nebulizer diffuser is similar to the ultrasonic diffuser, except it does not require water. As a result, this type of diffuser provides a continuous supply of concentrated essential oils, doesn’t require refilling the water tank, and has a much lower risk of mold growth. But these units can be more expensive, louder, and use up the oils more quickly.
Clary sage oil has a great aroma and is a natural antidepressant. It is one of the best natural remedies for anxiety with no associated side effects. It is perfect for uplifting your mood and can help ease the feelings of anxiety by calming your mind while boosting confidence and self-esteem. A study conducted on rats revealed that clary sage oil has the potential to positively influence the dopamine levels in both the brain and body.7

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.


Defined as the hybrid of a sour orange and a lemon, Bergamot is a fruit used for its essential oil, and it's really common in perfumes and beauty products thanks to its sweet, citrusy smell. Since it's also antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, and capable of improving your mood, this oil is an awesome pick if you make your own homemade soaps, deodorants, and cosmetics. It's also effective in balms and chapsticks, as it can heal wounds.

Without a doubt, the essential oil revolution has rapidly grown in the past two decades due to the business model known as multi-level marketing (MLM). While essential oils have truly been around since the dawn of time, Young Living and doTerra, the largest essential oil giants, have brought oils into dinner conversations nationally. Both of these companies use multi-level marketing. This direct sales model is a hierarchy of independent distributors. These distributors are promised a cut of the profit from the distributors they recruit to work under them. Hence the hierarchy structure. Seems reasonably enticing. I know I was always excited in my teenage years when a new Avon catalog came out. From the amazing success stories of friends, I even tried Isagenix… for all of one month. So what’s the problem with many multi-level marketing companies?


Much of my frustration comes from mlm companies proclaiming that THEIR oils are the best and that therapeutic grade means everything. Because there are not alot of distilleries around the world, many of us are getting our oils from the exact same places. Yet MLM’s tend to jack their prices up to over double in some cases, and use their claims as being the best to fortify the price increase. I do feel for consumers though. It is hard to know who to trust. I know of quite a few wonderful companies out there, besides mine that have wonderful, well priced oils. Yes, as you said, you will also pay for quality, but you need to trust who that supplier is. MLM’s will always have higher prices because of their structure. While that bothers me, it is their exclusivity that bothers me more, especially when I know we are sourcing from the same places.
P.S. Not sure if you can use an essential oil on your child? I highly recommend that you download this comprehensive list of essential oils that should NOT be used on children. It was compiled (and used with permission) by Lea Harris from the book, Essential Oil Safety: A Guide for Health Care Professionals and it is SO helpful! For more of her resources visit: www.learningabouteos.com.

But, do they really work? The short answer is yes. We asked Pamela Dalton, a cognitive psychologist from the Monell Chemical Senses center, if using essential oils could help solve all our 2018 problems. “Yes, any essential oil or fragrance can act as an aromatherapy agent,” explained Dalton. “What is required is that the person finds the scent pleasant and associates it with an emotional state that they wish to be invoked, such as relaxation or invigoration.”

Most of us need to watch how much we spend. It’s very tempting to buy essential oils from the companies that sell them for the lowest price. Price alone isn't an indication of quality, but it can be. Knowledgeable vendors that spend countless hours locating quality oils, pay the expensive fees to test their oils (refer to the links available towards the bottom of the page to learn more about essential oil testing) and provide the results to customers and provide free samples upon request should rightfully be charging more for their oils than retailers that stock oils that they've sourced from the cheapest sources.
Essential oils are most commonly either inhaled as a fine mist of vapor through aromatherapy, or diluted with water or carrier oil, such as almond oil, avocado oil, coconut oil, jojoba oil, or olive oil and applied directly to the skin.(5) Most essential oils, unless they are specifically food-grade quality, are not ingested. One way to use food-grade peppermint oil or lemon oil is to blend a few drops into a glass of water for potential internal support. Peppermint oil gives sparkling (carbonated) water a refreshing wintery flavor and may help support a calm stomach.
In our scent tests the Stillpoint’s oils started off smelling mild and fresh, but then after a minute or two they magically blossomed and became very rich, deep, vibrant, stronger and more clear; almost like a fine wine opens up after being uncorked for some time. And for those who may be sensitive to subtle energies, these oils possessed a very clean and high vibration, which is an enormous benefit when using the oils for spiritual practice. No other oils we tested performed this way.
Then we purchased bottles of Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia), and Lemon (Citrus limon) from each of the seven companies we selected to perform our in-house testing. We gathered a group of four people from our office and administered a formal blind smell test to evaluate which oils smelled the best and which smelled the worst out of the selections.
Thank you Holly! I’m happy to see someone stand up and clarify the fact that doTerra does stand behind their oils. To state such a statement of an oil to 100% certified pure therapeutic grade does mean something….especially is you consider using them internally or for cooking. If you are considering using essential oils instead of over the counter drugs, which contain many chemical ingredients (by the way, they use the same plants to create their drugs only they change them chemically and add other things), why not go all the way and eliminate ALL toxic and chemical additions to your body?? My suggestion, do your homework and research! Don’t take someone’s word for it in a comment. Buy a few bottles of the same oil (I hope you’ll consider doTerra) and compare how you feel.

I use Young Living Essential Oils. They are the most pure and best for anyone. Most articles say not to ingest them (that means that something hidden has been added). I would steer clear of those companies. Young Living can be ingested. I am motivated to use them because they do work. go to Young Living website and check it out. If you are interested in signing up, contact me. Signing up means buying at 24% discount. You are able to earn free products. Other oil companies are less expensive, that is because the process of producing it means cutting corners. I want the most pure. I will pay extra for the best.


According to a review published in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, “at least 90 essential oils can be identified as being recommended for dermatological use, with at least 1,500 combinations.” What gives essential oils their skin benefits is their ability to fight against pathogens that are responsible for dermatological infections. Essential oils can also help to improve inflammatory skin conditions, like dermatitis, eczema and lupus, improve the general appearance of your skin and even aid wound healing. (16)
The good news is that the guessing work will be gone in the next few years. Gary Young, founder of Young Living has been asked by the FDA to set up a standards for the United States. So it will not matter what the customer service or distributors say as we will be able to refer to the FDA classify the oil. This will make the true pure oils to stand up and be noticed but also for safety for our health to take the purest of the pure oils for our medicines!
As for this set, it’s a great way to get some commonly used essential oils for a deal, as they are cheaper in this set than they would be individually. This set includes: Bergamot, Clary Sage, Cinnamon Cassia, Eucalyptus (Globules), Grapefruit, Lavender, Lemon, Lime, Patchouli, Peppermint Supreme, Rosemary, Spearmint, Orange & Tea Tree. They all smell reasonable to my untrained nose – not overpowering and cloying like artificial fragrance, and not weird and stinky like chemicals. The only one I can say I’m not super fond of is the Patchouli, but it’s because I’m not fond of the smell of Patchouli, not because it’s bad quality. I’ve already found lots of uses for these oils - they work great in bath bombs and in a diffuser, too. I’ve also discovered a nifty use for them: if you clean with vinegar but hate the smell, you can add 5 drops of peppermint and 5 drops of orange to the spray bottle full of vinegar, and by the next day, the smell changes! It smells far, far less vinegar-y after that. I use them in my spray-mop solution and it works great for that, too.
As you've likely noticed, expanding your essential oil collection can get pretty expensive. If you're just starting out or you go through oils fast, consider this set from Plant Therapy. It comes with seven individual oils and seven blends for only $57, meaning that each bottle comes in at a little more than $4 each. You won't find this kind of deal anywhere else — especially since Plant Therapy is a trusted brand that uses only pure and therapeutic-grade ingredients. If that's not enough to sway you, it comes in an pretty wooden box and has over 400 reviews.
I tested grapefruit oil from Eden’s Garden, tea tree oil from Tea Tree Therapy, and vetiver oil from Nature’s Kiss brand (I think the tea tree oil I bought in a natural food store and the other brands from Amazon?), all on the same strip of yellow construction paper. After 20 minutes, there is a huge oily spot from the Nature’s Kiss oil (and looking at the label, I can see now it is embarrassingly low quality production as it looks sort of cheaply homemade- don’t recommend ever buying that brand if you see it). The Tea Tree Therapy spot is smaller and a little lighter, but still definitely an oily stain. The smallest, lightest one is the Eden’s Garden grapefruit spot, which I’m sort of glad about considering most of my oils are that brand, but I can still definitely see where it was dropped. I can’t really imagine an oil not leaving any spot behind at all, but if I ever find one that does, I would be very impressed.
Ugh. This is a tough one. I think they’re extremely overpriced. For example, 1/2 oz of bergamot YLEO is $32.50 and 1/2 oz of certified organic bergamot EO at Mountain Rose Herbs is $14.50. I see that YLEOs are “kosher certified,” which really doesn’t mean much of anything (as all plants and vegetables are automatically kosher and nothing special happens or is avoided that “makes” them kosher).
Anxiety disorders are prevalent psychiatric conditions that can be debilitating in many patients and include phobia, panic, general anxiety (GAD), and separation anxiety disorders.1 It is estimated that the 12-month prevalence of anxiety disorders is about 10% in the adult population and that females are twice as likely to have an anxiety disorder in comparison with males.2,3 Afflicted individuals typically exhibit both psychiatric and somatic symptoms, with depression, sleep disturbance, and substance use disorders being common comorbidities.4-6 Current anxiolytic treatment options have limitations in efficacy, such as delay to onset (eg, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, buspirone) as well as habituation, tolerance, and abuse potential (eg, benzodiazepines, pregabalin). Other limiting factors include side effects, like sedation (eg, hydroxyzine, benzodiazepines) and withdrawal syndromes (eg, benzodiazepines, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors).7 Even when used appropriately, anxiolytic agents may lack efficacy or only be partially effective in controlling symptoms, warranting the consideration of complementary or alternative treatment options.
Diffusion is the process of dispersing essential oils so that their aroma fills a room or an area with the essential oil fragrance. Therefore, a diffuser is a device that diffuses the essential oil into the air. There are several types of diffusers available on the market in 2018, and many have reviews that may help you decide which one may be right for you, if you are interested in getting a diffuser.
On the bright side, dōTERRA sources their essential oils from growers across the globe who use a distillation process of low-heat steam distillation or cold extraction for select essential oils. Their global botanical network encompasses farmers and distillers in 40 different countries. dōTERRA offers full insight into the consumer journey from essential oil sourcing to delivering the bottle to a consumers’ hand, on their website Source to You. GC/MS quality reports are also available for download on this website.
Promising Review: “I’m an essential-oil snob. I collect oils for all sorts of therapeutic uses, mostly external. This is the first lavender oil I’ve purchased that has specifically stated it’s safe to ingest. I’ve been ingesting it, and I find it very anxiolytic; I take it in filtered still water or add it to sparkling water (this is my new favorite refreshment). The oil smells just as a good lavender oil should, and I’m impressed with the purity of it and its suitability for internal and external uses. It’s much easier and potent using this oil as opposed to making a messy tisane with dried lavender buds. I go through lavender oil faster than I do other oils (I think this is the case with most frequent users of essential oils, as it’s arguably a staple of any collection), and I’ll definitely make this my go-to brand/company for lavender oil.” – KittenLitter
I use peppermint EO after brushing my teeth on my tongue…it lasts so much longer than mouthwash, but is it safe to do this? I just take a couple of drops and rub it all over my tongue. I was concerned, however, after reading this article. Is the way I’m using it considered taking it internally? And, is it dangerous to do this since the oil has not been diluted in a carrier oil? Thanks!!
Essential oils have also shown to improve learning, memory and ability to focus. Both stimulating and sedative essential oils can be useful, as oils like peppermint can improve sustained attention over a longer period of time, while oils like lavender can be useful for people going through tough exercises or situations. Furthermore, essential oils can be useful in relieving agitation in individuals with dementia. This is due to their calming and sedative effects. (10)
Industry expert Dr. Kurt Schnaubelt offers nothing but genuine and authentic essential oils at Original Swiss Aromatics. Their safeguard against adulteration is close relationships with each producer that often wild harvest and organically certify their products. Be sure to shop their collection if you're in search of rare oils or always want information on the oil's production and collection.
Nat, I will back you on this. Young Living and DoTerra distributors are confidently spreading lots of false information on essential oils. I would trust Crunchy Betty’s information above over anything YL and DoTerra sellers say. A good friend of mine became entranced by YL a couple of years ago and is convinced that YL is the only company that sells “therapeutic” grade essential oils. As Nat says, do your research, read the best books you can find and caveat emptor.
On the bright side, dōTERRA sources their essential oils from growers across the globe who use a distillation process of low-heat steam distillation or cold extraction for select essential oils. Their global botanical network encompasses farmers and distillers in 40 different countries. dōTERRA offers full insight into the consumer journey from essential oil sourcing to delivering the bottle to a consumers’ hand, on their website Source to You. GC/MS quality reports are also available for download on this website.
This is the biggest and most hotly argued aspect of the unregulated essential oil market. Be aware, there are no official legal bindings to the terms, “Pure”, “100% Pure”, “Natural”, and “Therapeutic Grade”; in fact there are no grades at all regarding essential oils. If you see any of these, or similar terms on essential oils, they are completely meaningless marketing slogans.

Both companies' skin care products had ingredients rated 3 and above on EWG's Skin Deep rating system. I prefer to stick with ingredients rated 2, at the highest. Depending on what you are looking for, that may or may not be acceptable to you. Of course it depends on their performance too. I don't think all of EWG's ratings are flawless, but I do pay attention when I see higher ratings there.
For those who turn to essential oils for a specific therapeutic goal, considering energetics may seem baffling. While you need not work on an energetic, soul level to reap the benefits of aromatherapy, it’s useful to understand the chemistry. Evidence from Ancient Egypt tells us that aromatic oils were likely being used before 4500 B.C. The ancient Egyptians are renowned for their knowledge of cosmetics and fragrant ointments—with their most famous herbal preparation being "Kyphi," which was a multipurpose spiritual blend of 16 ingredients.
We've covered a lot about aiding mood and mentality, but what about the more physical healing benefits of essential oils? Many plants are natural antiseptics, anti-inflammatories, antimicrobials, and antivirals, so when concentrated into essential oil form, they can function as highly effective remedies for acne, muscle soreness, sore throats, and more. Take ever-versatile peppermint oil, for example. "It's cooling, and can be found in formulated muscle care products along with eucalyptus, wintergreen, and German chamomile essential oils to name a few," Avery says. Try her go-to recipe for a DIY leg rub: "Add 10 drops of peppermint essential oil to one ounce of sweet almond oil, and rub it into leg muscles and feet."
Do not take any oils internally and do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin without advanced essential oil knowledge or consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children. It is safest to consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using oils with children. For in-depth information on oil safety issues, read Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young.
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