Lemongrass is another spa staple, and for good reason. People who inhaled three to six drops of the fragrance showed a reduction in their anxiety and tension levels immediately, according to a study published in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine. Plus, despite responding with anxiousness to a test designed to measure anxiety levels (makes sense), these same people completely recovered from the stress in just five minutes.
Thank you for all this info. While a patient in the hospital, I would sprinkle a mix of lavender, eucalyptus, and peppermint oils in my pillow. It helped with my headaches and allowed me to relax. The nurses kept coming into my room just to inhale the wonderful scents. They took such great care of me that, after I was discharged, i went home and made 50 bottles of the same mixtures in cobalt blue bottles with roller balls. They loved them so much! They use them at home and at work. Being a nurse myself, I understand what they go through on a daily bases and how much these oils will benefit them. Even one of my doctors took several bottles I’ve made to give to patients!
I do have one BIG complaint about do-terra and it has nothing to do with the quality of their oils. They tell their young impressionable (and unlearned) people that their oils are so pure that they can be mixed with food, beverages, or put in capsules for anti-biotic use. Lets get two things straight here, “Antibiotic properties” are not the same as an “anti-biotic” and if you actually did ingest enough EO to actually do what they profess they can do, it would probably kill you as it would be so toxic.

Aromatherapy: Through the practice of aromatherapy, essential oils are diluted in water and released into the air using a diffuser. Breathing in essential oil molecules may stimulate parts of your brain that influence physical, emotional, and mental health. According to the University of Maryland Medical Center, for example, some scientists believe that inhaling lavender essential oil may affect brain cells in a similar manner to some mild sedatives, while other researchers believe these molecules may interact with hormones or enzymes in the blood.(6)

I tested grapefruit oil from Eden’s Garden, tea tree oil from Tea Tree Therapy, and vetiver oil from Nature’s Kiss brand (I think the tea tree oil I bought in a natural food store and the other brands from Amazon?), all on the same strip of yellow construction paper. After 20 minutes, there is a huge oily spot from the Nature’s Kiss oil (and looking at the label, I can see now it is embarrassingly low quality production as it looks sort of cheaply homemade- don’t recommend ever buying that brand if you see it). The Tea Tree Therapy spot is smaller and a little lighter, but still definitely an oily stain. The smallest, lightest one is the Eden’s Garden grapefruit spot, which I’m sort of glad about considering most of my oils are that brand, but I can still definitely see where it was dropped. I can’t really imagine an oil not leaving any spot behind at all, but if I ever find one that does, I would be very impressed.
WRONG. I am NOT a distributor. Not a marketer. Not an advertisement. How cynical Brigitte, that you do not think there are people who exist in this world who actually care about dedicating some simple free time here and there to CARING ABOUT, HELPING OTHERS, and SHARING their experiences. It worked for me. I am not saying it will work for everyone. But I do feel obligated to share my healing experiences after more than 7 years of chronic illness and pain. I make ZERO funds from young living. ZERO ZERO ZERO. I am not a salesperson. I am not a distributor. I purchase for myself and my children and husband. No one receives compensation from young living unless they have people signed up under them which I do NOT NOT NOT and that is a fact that could be proven in a court of law somewhere, unlike much of the dribble that is written here by you. Moreover, I know SEVERAL others like me who order from Young living and have NO interest in selling it and make no money from it. No gimmicks. I have used other oils. I am sharing info about my EXPERIENCE with what has worked best for me in the hopes that others can also do their own research based on my opinion and then make educated choices about what is best for themselves. However, we can clearly see YOUR motives of money money money. Gross! and that is just my OPINION. Not a bought and paid for tribute to “MY’ brand.
The Young Living Speech you give is completely inaccurate and part of the genius marketing used by YL. Oils that have “do not consume” are protecting themselves from lawsuits, it’s a reasonable label statement. I am an educator at a major US University teaching essential oil studies. I have worked in production and quality control of essential oils.
Chances are you've already come across essential oils—maybe you've even used essential oils for anxiety. Like when your yoga instructor rubbed some on your shoulders at the end of practice, or when you always feel so zen at your friend's apartment because she has that aromatic diffuser on her countertop. In this increasingly health-conscious world, these plant-derived liquids are suddenly popping up everywhere.
One of the best parts about shopping on Amazon is the insane selection, and searching for "essential oils" on the mega-site will return more than 100,000 results. But that also means a wide range in quality, especially because the way in which essential oils are made greatly affects their potency and purity. If your goal is to buy essential oil on Amazon without sacrificing quality, keep scrolling for expert tips and product recommendations that are worth your money.
Our sense of smell is directly wired to the brain’s centers of memory and emotion. Cells inside the nose detect smells in our environment, and send information to the brain, via the olfactory nerve. (We also have a cluster of cells the top of the throat that detect scents from the food we consume, and pass that information along the same olfactory channel to the brain.) The information about smell does immediately to the limbic system of the brain, which includes regions like the amygdala that control emotional reactions and memory.  
Not only should you enjoy using different essential organic oils in your diffuser, but you can tell that it’s a good idea to make mixtures. You might even come up with your own unique mixture that you like the best for certain types of situations. Just make sure you do know the actual benefits. It helps to know what oils work best together, and how to dilute them.
Do not take any oils internally and do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin without advanced essential oil knowledge or consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children. It is safest to consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using oils with children. For in-depth information on oil safety issues, read Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young.
On essential oil bottles, though, small, high-quality suppliers will always tell you the Latin binomial (indicating the plant genus and species), where and how the oil was distilled, and whether it’s organic or wild-harvested. The Latin name is important because there are many species of certain plant families, like lavender. In fact, there are over 250 species of eucalyptus—only eight of which are commonly used in aromatherapy. Knowing where an oil is from is key to understanding environmental factors that alter chemical constituents and aroma. For instance, lavender (Lavandula angustifolia) from France is considered superior to lavender grown in other countries, like Bulgaria.

If you pass through the natural health aisles of your local grocery store, you’re likely to see small glass bottles of curious liquids with poignant aromas that could fill a room. Scents like lavender, eucalyptus, tea tree oil and orange line the shelves next to oil blends with promising labels like Anxiety Release, Detoxification Aide, Energize, Immune Support, Meditative Mood, and more. While some modern shoppers may be speculative of these products, ancient homemade versions of these single note essential oils and essential oil blends have been used for nearly 6,000 years for everything from traditional medical practices to spiritual rituals.
Tea Tree Oil has a green, medicinal, woody scent that makes it a wonderful addition to DIY natural home cleaning products. Native to Australia, it's fabulous for helping to clear teenage blemishes and other problem skin areas. Not sure what to blend it with? Tea Tree oil blends perfectly with Rose Absolute, Nutmeg, Pine, Bergamot, Lavender, Lemon and many more!
Hi, Ok I’m a guy, get over it. lol! I have Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. I have gone to tons of Homeopathic docs for help. I’m still sick as a dog. :>( I like this EO idea. I got the Rosemary and been sniffing it, put some under my nose and got a tiny rash, now I know why, I didn’t dilute it, hehe! EO is one of the few things I have tried that shows promise! I saw (on another site) that adding Rosemary to a saline solution (2 drops) nose spray, can help. What do you think about this? Thanks, Newbie
Some essential oils have even been applied to the dead as part of the embalming process. We know this because residues have been found in tombs dating over 2,000 years old! Essential oils are also prevalent in aromatherapy, which was advanced by French surgeon Jean Valnet, who learned that essential oils could help treat soldiers during World War II — a time when medications were scarce.
Disclosure of Material Connection: I am the President and Founder of American College of Healthcare Sciences, the Institution that publishes this blog. However, all opinions are my own. This blog may contain affiliate links. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”
Thank you so much for all of your information that you share. It seems like when I google something about essential oils, I frequently end up on your site. I am new to essential oils and not sure what to expect. It seems like when I use them in lotion, roll-on, or even a eucalyptus steam the scent dissipates relatively quickly. I am not sure if I am not adding enough essential oils, if I am buying lower quality essential oils, or if I am expecting too much. For instance, a 8 oz batch of lotion (I used 30 drops total of essential oil)that I made last week no longer has a scent to it (at least to me). Any insight on this?

If you have trouble sleeping because of anxiety and racing thoughts, inhaling essential oils at bedtime may help. “Just make sure the scent isn’t so strong that it will wake you once you fall asleep,” says Dr. Lee. Sleeping with a combination diffuser/humidifier will also add moisture to the air, which may also improve sleep quality during seasons when the air is dry. This one boasts more than 2,000 rave Amazon reviews.
The only types of essential oils that should EVER be used are THERAPEUTIC GRADE essential oils. Otherwise, all the benefits of the essential oils are lost to the SYNTHETIC PETROCHEMICALS that are in MOST essential oils (even the ones you get at the health food store… I wont name brands)There are only two name brands that I know of that sell therapeutic grade essential oils.(there could be more) Those brands are Young Living ( Which I highly recommend) and Doterra. More expensive does mean better. Young Living does not sell any of its oils to any other company. There are only a handful of distilleries in the world that’s why most E.O’s are poor imitators. They are not all getting the oils from the same place. They are made in a lab instead.
There are synthetic versions of many essential oils. They are artificially synthesized in chemical plants by combining various substances, usually aromatic derivatives of coal tar. Their chemical composition could be near identical to the natural components of the essential oils. Some may even smell exactly the same. However, they may not have the same therapeutic properties.
Also, if you drink it, you should only use a glass or stainless steel container. Glass is highly preferred over the two and the easiest for cleaning out of the previous EO. The smell/taste of an EO tends to “linger” a bit. This is usually a good thing I would think in say aromatherapy but in this case not so much…unless of course you prefer to use the same EO each time.
×