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Yes, of the 3 brands I am most comfortable using for therapeutic purposes the first is doTerra. Its testing exceeds everything else I’ve come across protecting against not just fillers and chemical extraction, but also against oxidation for potency levels. When air hits the oils for a period of time they oxidize slowly and if that happens they may be less quick and effective than if they had not had that time to oxidize. No other company tests the same number of times for this level of potency. I also love that the testing is done by a third party rather than in house testing.
Known in the Bible as one of the Three Kings gifts to baby Jesus, Myrrh remains popular today. This essential oil promotes relaxation through its amber aroma. Myrrh is a perfect addition for meditation to help relieve tension and create a calming environment. Diffusing Myrrh can help worries melt away while creating a sense of strength. Add Myrrh to a skin-care routine to help reduce the appearance of weathered skin such as redness and wrinkles. Additionally, rinse or gargle with Myrrh to back oral and gum health.
I was just barely speaking with a girl who is a certified aromatherapist and she said that people need to be very careful with wintergreen because it is such a strong blood thinner. I think this may be part of why it specifically is deemed unsafe for internal use (whether its pure or not). When it says wintergreen oil on ingredients lists I’m willing to bet it is a synthetically created oil or other form of it rather than the essential oil because of its therapeutic properties.
Supercritical carbon dioxide is used as a solvent in supercritical fluid extraction. This method can avoid petrochemical residues in the product and the loss of some "top notes" when steam distillation is used. It does not yield an absolute directly. The supercritical carbon dioxide will extract both the waxes and the essential oils that make up the concrete. Subsequent processing with liquid carbon dioxide, achieved in the same extractor by merely lowering the extraction temperature, will separate the waxes from the essential oils. This lower temperature process prevents the decomposition and denaturing of compounds. When the extraction is complete, the pressure is reduced to ambient and the carbon dioxide reverts to a gas, leaving no residue.
Many essential oils affect the skin and mucous membranes in ways that are valuable or harmful. Many essential oils, particularly tea tree oil, may cause contact dermatitis.[19][20][21][22] They are used in antiseptics and liniments in particular. Typically, they produce rubefacient irritation at first and then counterirritant numbness. Turpentine oil and camphor are two typical examples of oils that cause such effects. Menthol and some others produce a feeling of cold followed by a sense of burning. This is caused by its effect on heat-sensing nerve endings. Some essential oils, such as clove oil or eugenol, were popular for many hundred years in dentistry as antiseptics and local anesthetics.
There is also an argument from YL distributors that their oils come from the best crops in the world. As they grow their own crops and only use their own, not sure how they can claim it’s unarguably the best in the world. Every crop is different. Only sampling every crop, every batch would support that claim. Anyway, I am not a qualified aromatherapist either but my research suggests that YL oils and their advice might be best to avoid.
Mountain Rose Herbs also holds quite a few certifications and awards pertaining to their product sourcing, including non-GMO project certification, and the 2013 Best Green Business’s To Work For In Oregon. Overall, this company is making quite a few awesome commitments to better, green business practices and if you like this ideology, this is your company to support.

Umm….. you work in a pyramid, we all do. As someone who was a part of your industry and transitioned out due to the lack of sustainable income, I moved into mlm. Over the last 7 years it has been great and according to my physician, the products I take are a great part of my own improved health. Personally, it’s okay to hate mlm, especially if you really have it your all for a whole month…., or you quit too soon as most do.
A pilot study published in Complementary Therapies in Clinical Practice found that the use of aromatherapy as a complementary therapy helped to reduce anxiety and depression scales in postpartum women. Women between zero and 18 months postpartum were divided into either a treatment group that inhaled a blend of rose and lavender essential oils or a control group that didn’t receive any type of aromatherapy. After four weeks, the women using aromatherapy had significant improvements in anxiety and depression symptoms compared to those in the control group. (12)
Bath: Avoid dripping your essential oil directly into the bath water; you always want to mix it first with a natural emulsifier like honey, milk, a carrier oil, or even sea salt. Doing this will help emulsify and disperse the essential oils into the water. If you don’t do this, the oils will simply sit on the surface of the water and come into direct contact with your skin, possibly causing burns and dermal toxicity.
Estrogenic and antiandrogenic activity have been reported by in vitro study of tea tree oil and lavender essential oils. Two published sets of case reports suggest the lavender oil may be implicated in some cases of gynecomastia, an abnormal breast tissue growth in prepubescent boys.[44][45] The European Commission's Scientific Committee on Consumer Safety dismissed the claims against tea tree oil as implausible, but did not comment on lavender oil.[46] In 2018, a BBC report on a study stated that tea tree and lavender oils contain eight substances that when tested in tissue culture experiments, increasing the level of estrogen and decreasing the level of testosterone. Some of the substances are found in "at least 65 other essential oils". The study did not include animal or human testing.[47]
Choose certified pure therapeutic grade essential oils over synthetic ones. Unnatural chemically altered oils are not considered true essential oils. It is also important to note that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not regulate essential oils for quality or safety. Look for USDA Certified Organic or 100% essential oil on the label, instead of anything that says “perfume oil” or “aromatherapy oil,” which indicates the oil may have been blended with unnatural ingredients.
Thank You SO MUCH for this article. I recently saw something on tv !@ essential oils- I have been using essential oils for a couple of years – in a diffuser, in baths, roll-ons, etc.. I have been on the computer ‘googling’ for hours-this is the most informative & helpful information I have found-THANK YOU – YOU LISTED EVERYTHING I WAS LOOKING FOR!! (that being said, I am now throwing out the majority of my various botles of essential oils (diff. brands) because they contain synthetics WHICH IS ABSOLUTELY THE LAST THING I WANT OR NEED (I have CFIDS/FM) Thank You Again,
The use of essential oils for medicinal purposes has an ancient history, going back to early Egyptian, Chinese, and Roman societies. Ever hear of the Hippocratic Oath? That’s the ethical pledge taken by physicians for centuries (now, often taken by students upon graduation from medical school). It’s named for Greek physician, Hippocrates, who studied the effects of essential oils and was a proponent of their healing, health-promoting properties.

Thank you so much for putting this information together. I really like this site. I am excited to follow it and learn more. I am in a company that does adaptogens and recently started seeing and learning that some of the EO’s are also adaptogens. I started using some and got some terrific results. Lots of stress that has been relieved. Then I had started to lose weight and after about 46 lbs found I could use grapefruit and frankincense and it was helping with taking away the wrinkles a saggy parts. Maybe you could cover this in some of your articles..


I signed up to be a DoTerra Essential Oils consultant about a year ago, and I couldn’t be happier with my choice. I get high quality 100% pure therapeutic grade oils for a good price. I’ve used Frankincense and Lavender undiluted on my son since he was born. I’ve also taken advantage of my diffuser. My favorite blends to diffuse are their Breathe (which has been a lifesaver when my babe is congested -and the rest of the family too) and their On Guard. We diffused On Guard last fall quite often and nobody in our house caught so much as a cold. Which was so nice, considering the new baby in the house -and considering Hubby is a teach and typically brings bugs home at the start of new school years. My personal favorites are Lemon and Peppermint. I add a drop or two of lemon to my drinks when I feel a sore throat coming on, or when I feel like I need a bit of a mood/ energy lift. And peppermint works well for headaches and aches in general. 🙂 If you’re interested in DoTerra let me know. I live in the Colorado Springs area and I teach EO classes occasionally.
For an essential oil that is safe to take internally, only use 1-2 drops in a gel capsule (available here) or diluted in 6-8 ounces of water. Remember, one drop can be the equivalent of taking many pounds of raw plant matter so a little goes a long way. If you take an essential oil internally and it feels too strong, try drinking a few ounces of water, eating an absorbent food like organic bread and additionally taking activated charcoal or bentonite clay to soak it up. This should reduce any discomfort significantly. However, if you take one drop as recommended above you should be fine. Remember to start slow and only use essential oils internally that are safe to do so. Also, do not take more than 1 or 2 drops per day and take a break every few weeks to allow your body time to adjust.
I’m wondering.. I was thinking about trying the oil cleansing method (I have grapeseed oil and sunflower oil in my cabinet) and I was considering adding lemon essential oil just to see what it does and I read in this post not to use lemon if you’re nursing…why is that? I can’t imagine that lemon would hurt. Especially since I would just be putting a drop or two on my face, not drinking large quantities (I know, not possible, but I threw it out there as a referential visual lol). But yes, I’m never happy when I see “do not use” or “consult a medical professional” when breastfeeding on just about every product out there but none of them ever say why.. I’m very interested in the why’s of things, if you could help answer this one for me 🙂 thanks!
I am confused on your list of EOs to avoid while nursing or pregnant. Many of these oils I have never heard being issues. I use Lemon oil regularly and ginger as well, as a nursing mother. Could you perhaps list effects of each oil for breastfeeding mothers ? I know peppermint reduces production but confused on most of the others…. you listed ” Aniseed, cedarwood, chamomile, cinnamon, clary sage, clove, ginger, jasmine, lemon, nutmeg, rosemary, sage” I use several on this list currently and was about to put in a YL order for clary sage
Avoid buying oils from retailers/suppliers that don't provide the essential oil's botanical (Latin name), country of origin or method of extraction. I've bought good quality oils from companies that don't bother listing this information (though I contact them to confirm this information prior to purchase), but I often wonder why any truly knowledgeable vendor would not realize the importance of automatically including this information. For instance, there are multiple varieties of Bay, Cedarwood, Chamomile, Eucalyptus, and so on. Each offers different therapeutic properties. The country of origin for oils is also important because the climate and soil conditions can affect the resulting properties of the oil. Is that rose oil steam distilled or is it an absolute? Any good aromatherapy vendor should realize the necessity for providing this information.
In addition to debuting a new product category at Global Celebration, Isagenix also showcased its new branding at the event. As the company prepares to reach the billion-dollar revenue mark, it has evolved its brand to position for anticipated future growth and to best connect with existing and new customers in today’s health and wellness marketplace. The update includes a new brand architecture as well as design elements including a fresh color palette, logo, and packaging design.
Unfortunately, the scene has been set for unethical business practices as large corporate players drive raw material prices to low levels, often forbidding profit to be made. With rampant adulteration of oils (e.g., cheaper essential oils substituted and falsely labeled—like lavendin for lavender, or a completely synthetic laboratory-made oil labeled as wild-harvested), it’s crucial to be in the know about realistic essential oil prices—particularly for unadulterated, pure, and rare oils. For example, rose, jasmine, and sandalwood being sold in ½-ounce and 1-ounce sizes should raise some eyebrows. A single ounce of rose otto retails for $400 or more!
Thank you Holly! I’m happy to see someone stand up and clarify the fact that doTerra does stand behind their oils. To state such a statement of an oil to 100% certified pure therapeutic grade does mean something….especially is you consider using them internally or for cooking. If you are considering using essential oils instead of over the counter drugs, which contain many chemical ingredients (by the way, they use the same plants to create their drugs only they change them chemically and add other things), why not go all the way and eliminate ALL toxic and chemical additions to your body?? My suggestion, do your homework and research! Don’t take someone’s word for it in a comment. Buy a few bottles of the same oil (I hope you’ll consider doTerra) and compare how you feel.
Do not take any oils internally and do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin without advanced essential oil knowledge or consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children. It is safest to consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using oils with children. For in-depth information on oil safety issues, read Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young.
Certain essential oils are safe to use during pregnancy, but care must be taken when selecting quality and brand.[51] Some essential oils may contain impurities and additives that may be harmful to pregnant women. Sensitivity to certain smells may cause pregnant women to have adverse side effects with essential oil use, such as headache, vertigo, and nausea. Pregnant women often report an abnormal sensitivity to smells and taste,[52] and essential oils can cause irritation and nausea when ingested. Always consult a doctor before use.
To help us get a more clear understanding of what to look for in essential oils we spoke with Clinical Registered Aromatherapist, Anna Doxie. She is the founder of the Institute of Holistic Phyto-Aromatherapy. She’s the Director Coordinator and Director of the Southern California Region of the National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy (NAHA) and an esteemed Aromatherapy instructor. We’ve also combed through NAHA’s educational materials, consulted the prolific writings of Dr. Robert Pappas — a highly respected name in essential oil testing and education — and sought many other independent sources of information to present to you some guidelines for finding the best essential oil:

Terms of Use Important! Customers should purchase products from Bulk Apothecary with the clear understanding that all products must be used at the customers own discretion and only after referencing Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) and all other relevant technical information specific to the product. Bulk Apothecary sells all of it’s Nature’s Oil brand and Bulk Apothecary Brand products for manufacturing purposes only.  Consequently all of these products may not be labeled for consumer use.  This includes nutritional facts labels where applicable.  Bulk Apothecary shall not be held responsible for any damages to property or for any adverse physical effects (including injury or bodily harm) caused by insufficient knowledge or the improper use of a product. The user of the product is solely responsible for compliance with all laws and regulations applying to the use of the products.  As with any manufacturing process, Bulk Apothecary strongly recommends small scale testing for evaluation purposes prior to full commercial manufacturing. The information on Bulk Apothecary website is obtained from current and reliable sources but makes no representation as to its comprehensiveness or accuracy.  Nothing contained herein should be considered as a recommendation by Bulk Apothecary as to the fitness for any use. As the ordinary or otherwise use(s) of this product is outside the control of Bulk Apothecary, no representation or warranty, expressed or implied is made as to the effect(s) of such use(s)  (including damage or injury), or the results obtained.  The liability of Bulk Apothecary is limited to the value of the goods and does not include any consequential loss. Bulk Apothecary shall not be liable for any errors or delays in the content, or for any actions taken in reliance thereon.  Please note, the International Federation of Aromatherapists do not recommend that Essential Oils be taken internally unless under the supervision of a Medical Doctor who is also qualified in clinical Aromatherapy. In addition, Essential Oils must be properly diluted before use in order to avoid any damages to property or adverse physical effects (including injury or bodily harm).  Furthermore, Essential Oils supplied by Bulk Apothecary are recommended for external use only. Thank You.

CITRUS. Similar to sandalwood, this is a group of scents that can be stimulating or sleep-promoting, depending on your individual reaction and the type of citrus oil used. Bergamot, a type of orange, has been shown to relieve anxiety and improve sleep quality. Lemon oil has demonstrated anxiety and depression-relieving effects in research. Citrus may help some people fall asleep more easily, while others may find these fresh, bright scents are relaxing, but not sleep-promoting. If citrus scents are stimulating to you, don’t use them before bed—but do consider using them during the day, to help you feel both refreshed and relaxed.
Promising Review: “I have tried Vanilla “essential oil” by Aura Cacia and Plant Therapy, but this one is my favorite now. Plant Therapy smells great but it is brown and stained my clothes. Also their CO2 Vanilla is off the charts expensive and their reasonably priced vanilla uses a potentially toxic solvent extraction method. Aura Cacia uses the CO2 method of “extraction” (healthiest, most natural) but it is far more expensive for the same potency. This is absolutely the BEST price for CO2 Vanilla that I have seen.” – mommy2010

I have bought dozens of essential oils from Piping Rock. Their prices are simply the best, especially considering the free shipping and “Crazy Deals” they offer and change almost daily. You can get 15 ml of 100% neroli oil for about $15, and it’s lovely! They also have a 15 ml bottle of 100% West Indian sandalwood for $39.95, and it smells GREAT. A 15 ml bottle of 100% pure cistus oil is about $13 or $14. It can’t be beat! Many of the normally cheaper oils (peppermint, orange, cedarwood, tangerine, tea tree, pine etc.) are wonderfully priced too -almost a steal. Their rose, jasmine and tuberose blends did not disappoint scent-wise (they weren’t too weak at all). Their oils come in glass bottles with stoppers and pretty labels. I was scared at first because of how cheap their prices are, but I’m glad I took the chance. On top of the great products, they ship SUPER FAST, package well, and my orders are always complete and correct. So happy with this company. Lastly, by signing up with the http://www.mrrebates.com website (it’s free), and accessing piping rock from there, you will get a %10 discount on your purchase, which you eventually receive as a refund in cash that you can have added to your PayPal account. I’ve earned over $50 in refunds! I’ve seen this % go up and down by a little from time to time, but the average is 10% (which it is as of today, 5/8/14). Maybe wait for a “free shipping day” and try some of the cheaper oils to test the waters first. Even when you have to pay for shipping (for orders under $40), the shipping is a flat $3.95 rate!

#1- Therapeutic Grade is just a selling gimmick. If EO’s are pure, they are equal to any other. There are only a few distillery’s so many of the EO’s come from the same distillery then sold under several names. You should always buy from a company that is willing to give you the GC/MS reports regarding the Lot your EO bottle is from. That tells the constituents of the EO and would indicate if adulterated in any way.
I would like to start using EO in my home now that I am a mom and have become a lot more aware of the harsh chemicals in all of my cleaning supplies, beauty products and air fresheners. I am currently EBF and know that there are certain EO that I should avoid. Does this mean I shouldn’t be exposed to them at all or that I should not use them topically?
We have used Frontier/AuraCacia, MountainRose, RockyMountain, PlantTberaly and are happy with each of them. However, we’ve found Edens Gardens to work well for us. We love their blends, their sales/specials pricing and their customer service. We occasionally use the other brands (especially in a pinch) and sometimes place a order for AuraCacia through our Frontier Co-OP account.

This may be important because according to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, an estimated 40 million American adults suffer from anxiety disorders.(21) While consulting a doctor to seek to address the causes of mental challenges, using essential oils is sometimes seen as an alternative or supportive therapy. For those looking to essential oils for additional support, the following oils may provide optimal support.

I don’t know much about EOs yet…I’m just learning. However, there are some vitamin B1 patches that are sold as bug repellants. They must be put on 2 hrs before exposure. Just a thought, as you work out your recipe for repellant. A natural vitamin supplement is a gentle way to keep the bugs away. Also, anyone who is bitten will usually become sensitized to bedbug bites about 2 weeks after the first time they get bitten. After that, their skin will start to react to bites just like yours does.
It turns out that for any of these companies to claim that their oil is 100% pure, only a very very small percentage of pure oil (less than 10% if I remember right) is required and the rest can be chemical additives. This particular company was one of the ones tested that did not mislead and did not have "filler" chemicals so that's why I personally made my purchase.
As we mentioned earlier, the FDA generally classifies essential oils as cosmetics, but they can also sometimes be considered drugs. In a quote direct from the US Food and Drug Administration website, “The law doesn’t require cosmetics to have FDA approval before they go on the market.” In addition, if a product claims to affect the health and function of the body, such as relieving anxiety, aiding digestion or calming sore muscles, the product must be approved by the FDA as a drug, which is a very long and costly process.
Essential oils prices at The Ananda Apothecary are fair, not too steep but also not too good to be true. Their specialty oils like Sandalwood, Helichrysum, or Rose are properly and fairly priced higher (as they should be), indicating a true quality product behind the label rather than a quick sale. Certain essential oils are just more expensive due to the incredible amount of effort and volume of plant materials required to produce the bottle of oil you buy.
No point on your feet, sweat glands on your feet, nothing that would actually absorb, only thing you are doing by putting it on your feet is inhaling it as you put it on your feet, but you are already doing that putting it on your chest, why waste it. Just google are there pores on your feet–dermatologist articles all over saying bottom line just what I said.
I’m partial to Plant Therapy and have been very happy with their oils and starter kits. Occasionally I purchase Floracopeia and Now products. Young Living and doTERRA just feel overpriced due to the fact they are an MLM brand and not worth the money when there are companies like Plant Therapy. Since E.O.’s have a shelf life between 1 and 2 years, their price points are a major consideration for me. Thank you for your E.O. list and reviews. I was happy to see Plant Therapy come out on top.
Not all essential oils are created equally, though, and certain oils are thought to better target anxiety while others may have different benefits. "Just make sure any oil you use is completely natural, organic plant essence," says Gillerman. Essential oils are not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, but you should look for options that are certified organic, says Gillerman. "It's your surefire way of making sure that you are getting an essential oil that is not diluted or polluted with a toxin or petrochemical."
Mountain Rose – This company was my very first experience buying outside of the grocery store. This was mainly because I did my research to find them and they offered both high quality essential oils, but also at great prices and in small sizes. Not only is it not much out of pocket, but I don’t have to buy a huge bottle of something I may not use all that often.
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