Depending on the plant and oil in question, it takes fairly large—sometimes huge—amounts of raw plant material to make tiny quantities of essential oils.  For example, to make just one half ounce of lavender essential oil it takes 27 square feet of lavender plants. To make the same amount of lemon essential oil it takes 75 lemons and to make the same amount of rose essential oil takes 22 pounds of rose petals. On average essential oils are approximately 75-100 times more concentrated than dried herbs.
Since we are not chemists, nor do we have the resources or equipment to evaluate the chemical purity of the essential oils, we stuck with methods of evaluation available to the average consumer. Out of the nearly 40 different essential oil companies researched we were able to narrow down the list to a total of seven reputable companies by using the parameters listed above in our section ‘What to look for when purchasing essential oils.’
As a person who suffers from anxiety/ depression. I appreciate information like this! This is one of the main reasons I started using oils and I have already experienced relief with Bergamont (my fav!), Lavender & Frank. I love to diffuse those 3 with Pink Grapefruit and not only does it smell amazing… I instantly feel better! Just purchased Neroli and Chamomile today… can’t wait to see how they work/ smell as well!
Vetiver essential oil has tons of therapeutic properties! This root oil can helps support a relaxed mental state, and is great to use before bed to ease a racing mind. The rustic, earthy, and woody aroma of this oil can be added to perfumes for a natural and pleasant smell. Vetiver is also effective for help with skin blemishes and helps maintain a strong immune system. Not a lot of this oil is required to notice a difference!
There are a few essential oils that are generally recognized as safe to use undiluted. Of course, there has to be a few exceptions to the rule. Again, in Organic Body Care Recipes, the author points out that the only essential oils that are widely acknowledged as safe to use undiluted (sparingly) are: lavender, German chamomile, tea tree, sandalwood, and rose geranium.
External secretory structures in plants are called glandular trichomes. They can be found on the surface of the plant (such as herbaceous leaves) and are thought to be responsible for the production of chemicals that deter or attract pests or pollinators. Glandular trichomes are most commonly found in the Lamiaceae (syn. Labiatae) family. The oil storage capacity varies from species to species and also between trichomes. Biochemical experiments have shown that these volatile oils are synthesized by highly refined enzyme reactions taking place within the plant.
You've likely heard about the soothing, sleep-inducing effects of chamomile tea, and those extend to chamomile essential oil. Chamomile is also a base note, so it has that same grounding effect as vetiver, says Gillerman. But studies have also shown a proven physiological response to it. Chamomile may actually "provide clinically meaningful antidepressant activity," according to research at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. (PS: These Five Aromatherapy Benefits Will Change Your Life.) 
Posted in: Aromatherapy, Natural Healthy & Beauty | Tagged: aromatherapy, aromatherapy 101, best essential oil brans, Christina Anthis, environment, essential oils, green, Green cleaning, Hippie Homemaker, Hippy Homemaker, lavender oil, mlm essential oil scam, mlm essential oils, mlm scam, The Hippy Homemaker, therapeutic grade, therapeutic grade scam, which essential oils to buy
The only types of essential oils that should EVER be used are THERAPEUTIC GRADE essential oils. Otherwise, all the benefits of the essential oils are lost to the SYNTHETIC PETROCHEMICALS that are in MOST essential oils (even the ones you get at the health food store… I wont name brands)There are only two name brands that I know of that sell therapeutic grade essential oils.(there could be more) Those brands are Young Living ( Which I highly recommend) and Doterra. More expensive does mean better. Young Living does not sell any of its oils to any other company. There are only a handful of distilleries in the world that’s why most E.O’s are poor imitators. They are not all getting the oils from the same place. They are made in a lab instead.
The only oils on the market safe to ingest are by a company called Young Living. If you are not a member you can obtain Eucalyptus oil by typing in Young Living Essential Oil Eucalyptus on an ebay or amazon search engine to try it out. One you do, you will surely want to become a member of this company. I use these oils on myself and children and am being healed of YEARS of chronic illness with these products. I am not a salesperson. I feel obligated to get EVERYONE with health issues this REAL AND TRUE HEALING MEDICINE that heals rather than just treating symptoms.
Thank you so much for the work you put into this . I found it very helpful. I’m just getting the oils and haven’t even purchased anything because I had no idea where to start. I started researching and was shocked at all the brands out there. I want to use a good oil but my funds are limited. I also started making candles and wanted a good brand that will hold the scent all the way to the end of the candle.
Ellen – Im sorry but you are mistaken. Essential oils ARE able to be ingested in their purest, natural form. The FDA even acknowledges this and has its OWN list of Essential Oils Generally Recognized as Safe for human consumption. If needed I can gladly link you. The FDA has in fact gone after them, not for “practicing medicine”, but for some of the uneducated reps who made claims that EO’s cured Ebola. At the same time, Dr Bronners people among OTHER companies received the same letters. They also did not file anything, they have sent them letters with “their demands” and now these companies need to meet them. Do not make a mountain out of a mole hill. I am with Young Living oils- because I care where my product comes from.
#3. EO’s if diluted properly (not neat) and ONLY certain EO’s are safe for children. Peppermint is not safe until at least 6 years of age, some say older, as it can be a mucous membrane irritant. Eucalyptus has a 1,8-cineole content, its not recommended for children until the age of 10. Very important for childrens safety to do due diligence…these are just a few that come to my mind right of way and why they aren’t safe for children. I know there is plenty of other oils that are safe for children diffused. Once older, then ok for application, diluted in carrier oil. I was told 2-10 years old is when you can start adding more EO’s to your child(ren) library, as they age, you can add more. Of course I know this is hugely a hot topic. It depends on who you ask when you can introduce EO’s to babies and children. I know the MLM say put them neat on babies feet. No ones feet (bottom) will absorb EO’s as we have glands on the bottom of our feet, not pores to absorb the EO’s.
One of the simplest ways to tell your body that you’re in control is by breathing deeply. When we get scared or stressed, our breath shallows, our heart rate increases, and cortisol levels run high. And chronic stress causes prolonged periods of these fight-or-flight reflexes. Deep breathing calms the body, regulates the heart rate, and almost tricks the brain.
Supercritical carbon dioxide is used as a solvent in supercritical fluid extraction. This method can avoid petrochemical residues in the product and the loss of some "top notes" when steam distillation is used. It does not yield an absolute directly. The supercritical carbon dioxide will extract both the waxes and the essential oils that make up the concrete. Subsequent processing with liquid carbon dioxide, achieved in the same extractor by merely lowering the extraction temperature, will separate the waxes from the essential oils. This lower temperature process prevents the decomposition and denaturing of compounds. When the extraction is complete, the pressure is reduced to ambient and the carbon dioxide reverts to a gas, leaving no residue.
Essential oils are highly concentrated plant extracts. A little goes a long way! That being said, don't be fooled. A small 5- or 10-ml bottle is very potent and will likely be enough to last you many months with frequent use. But, the shelf life of oils varies drastically. The general rule of thumb is to use essential oils within a year of purchase, but many will keep fresh for longer if refrigerated. In fact, many aromatherapists refrigerate precious oils and always keep citruses and more volatile, fleeting top-notes and carrier oils in the fridge.

Essential oils come from the process of hydrodistillation, steam distillation, solvent extraction, extraction under pressure, or other mechanical means of extracting oils from various parts of a plant, such as the roots, leaves, seeds, peels, bark, or blossoms. The concentrated liquid extracts contain naturally occurring chemical compounds, including terpenes, esters, aldehydes, ketones, alcohols, phenols, and oxides, which are volatile, meaning they’ll evaporate quickly when exposed to air.(4) The different chemical compositions affect the aroma of each essential oil and how it is absorbed and used by the body.
However, it’s important to note that these studies were assessing the soothing properties of lavender L. angustifolia and NOT lavandin Lavandula intermedia (Emeric ex Loisel.), which can have stimulating effects. As a reminder, be sure to inform your clients that it is crucial to check that the Latin name reads Lavandula angustifolia when using lavender essential oil for calming and uplifting purposes. 
Although, there is a method to extract essential oil into a carrier oil. It’s called “infusion”. Herbs are placed in a jar, and the jar is filled with just enough oil to cover the herbs. After at least 2 weeks, the herbs are strained out and you’re left with an infused oil! Sometimes, fresh herbs are placed into the infused oil to make it extra-strong. Infusion produces a very mild oil, though, and there’s no need to dilute it.
Ugh. This is a tough one. I think they’re extremely overpriced. For example, 1/2 oz of bergamot YLEO is $32.50 and 1/2 oz of certified organic bergamot EO at Mountain Rose Herbs is $14.50. I see that YLEOs are “kosher certified,” which really doesn’t mean much of anything (as all plants and vegetables are automatically kosher and nothing special happens or is avoided that “makes” them kosher).
"Essential oils are highly concentrated, volatile plant extracts," explains Avery. "We obtain essential oils through a few different extraction methods, and the part of the plant we get the essential oil from can be different depending on the oil but is typically the most aromatic part. Rose oil, for example, comes from the petals of the rose, while citrus oils come from the rind."
I bought frontier brand cinnamon flavoring at a health food store. Is this cinnamon considered an essential oil? It says to use a few drops in baking cookies, cakes and other recipes, or 2 Tbsp. in a quart in a quart of simmering water with cloves and cinnamon sticks for relaxation. I have been using 1/4tsp. to 1/2tsp and sometimes more several times a day on cereals, tea and other foods thinking it might help control my blood sugar which was edging up in the pre-diabetes range. Is it safe to be consuming this much (organic sunflower oil and cinnamon oil are the 2 ingredients listed on bottle) in this manner? 
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