Furthermore, what's interesting is that essential oils can be both calming and stimulating. The same oil can have a different "effect" depending on what is required of it. So a restless person may find that they feel calm after using a particular oil, while another individual who is feeling low and depressed may get an uplifting and invigorating effect using the same oil. This is why some essential oils are referred to as "adaptogens" because they can literally "adapt" to the needs of the person using the oil.
Hi! I suffer from connective tissue disease (similar to lupus or RA in pain), and I use lemongrass DILUTED in coconut oil. It is amazing how well this works for pain. Peppermint is awesome for headaches as well as nausea, and marjoram is another pain med. Some oils don’t do much for me except smell really good, but those three have been invaluable. I get mine from doTerra, but I’m going to check out the other site mentioned by Crunchy Betty. Thanks!
So far, the ANISAFRONA essential oil gift set has a shocking 4.8-star rating. They go through rigorous testing to ensure quality, are made without fillers and additives, and are USDA-certified organic. According to reviewers, they're a great option for diffusion because they're extremely potent and smell wonderful. "I could sense the purity of these oils in the aroma they exude within minutes of putting [them] in the diffuser," one reviewer raves.
Lemon Balm and its essential oil has been used medicinally for millennia to reduce anxiety, alleviate stress, improve sleep disorders (from restlessness to insomnia) and generally induce a state of calm and peace. Lemon Balm has been fairly well studied by researchers over the last few decades and has been found to have a variety of active medicinal compounds, such as flavonoids, polyphenols and more, with a number of impressive health benefits, including the ability to modulate neurotransmitter activity in the nervous system, making it one of the top essential oils for reducing anxiety and stress.
The truth is that there are MANY therapeutic grade standards. The problem is, which one do you trust? Its important for people to realize that all of these standards are INTERNAL standards developed by the company themselves and may or may not include quality control by a third party lab. Furthermore, if a third party lab is used, does this lab really know what they are doing? It’s also important to know what the company defines as being “therapeutic grade” does it simply mean that the oil is pure or does it mean something beyond purity and carry with it a quality standard as well? Let’s face it, an oil can be pure as the driven snow but still be low quality, I see this on a daily basis in the samples I analyze for my clients in order for them to make good buying decisions. Judgements about essential oil quality take more than just good chemists and good equipment, they require many years of experience in odor evaluation and knowing what specific minor components are desirable in an oil and not just focusing on the major components.

I’m familiar with EO at one time I used YL the only problem with that is they were to expensive in my opinion. So I quit for awhile. I deal on a daily basis with fibromylgia,osteoarthritis and anxiety. Due to all this my doctor took me off of a sleeping pill said I was sleeping to much in the day plus I went to the library for a free class about sleeping patterns and I was told to get off the OTC sleeping meds. Wow want to talk about a withdraw plus the lack of sleep I was getting. I was like an owl still sleeping in the day up at night. I had to do something. My sister told me about piping rock that’s where she’d been getting her essential oils. So I got my Lavender and Bergamont and at reasonable prices.Their great I sleep well now.
Most common essential oils such as lavender, peppermint, tea tree oil, patchouli, and eucalyptus are distilled. Raw plant material, consisting of the flowers, leaves, wood, bark, roots, seeds, or peel, is put into an alembic (distillation apparatus) over water. As the water is heated, the steam passes through the plant material, vaporizing the volatile compounds. The vapors flow through a coil, where they condense back to liquid, which is then collected in the receiving vessel.
Other essential oil manufacturers/distributors sell certified organic oils; DoTerra does not. other essential oil manufacturers do not use MLM scams to sell their products; DoTerra does. Other essential oil companies tell people up front that the FDA has not “approved this” info; DoTerra does not. Other companies warn people, as the association for aromatherapists does, that these oils should NEVER be ingested: DoTerra tells people to ingest them (BTW, there IS no “safe dose”; the “safe dose” is “none”). Other companies do not pretend to have scientific evidence when there isn’t any. Other companies don’t make up fake “certifications”. Your ridiculous comparison of tylenol or ibuprofen is just that: those are MADE to be ingested, and essential oils are NEVER meant to be ingested.
I started using oils about 3 months ago. I put a couple of drops of lemon in my water and drink it, use peppermint and citrus oils for aromatherapy energy bombs, have started using them for cleaning, and, I just found a great deoderant recipe that works for me! I’m a fairly large woman (5’10”, 300 pounds) and I sweat a lot, but this recipe works. I use 20 drops each of lemon, frankincense, and lavender in a small roller bottle topped with melted coconut oil. My pits don’t smell at all, even after a fairly hard workout. Some people like fractionated coconut oil, and others like grape seed oil. I prefer melted coconut oil because I like a slightly thicker viscosity. Plus, if it solidifies, just shake the bottle repeatedly and it will get back to normal. For those that want a spray recipe, fill your same 20 drops of each oil into a 3 oz spray bottle and then top it off with witch hazel.

I put this section here so that you can see the different brands of essential oils that I have used. This is not my list of essential oils to go buy. I make it clear who MY personal favorite essential oil company is, but as I stated before, using your own judgment and doing your research is very important in finding the company that you personally want to stand behind.


Here is a list from one hospital of what they use the oils for:We regularly treat gout, neuropathy, carpel tunnel, sinusitis, headaches, abdominal pain, kidney stone pain, neuralgia, tennis elbow, arthritis, back pain, leg cramps, post-op hip and knee pain and whatever else comes our way. Each patient’s need, including which Young Living Essential Oils were used, is documented in our electronic charting so we can track their outcomes. We always have a good stock of Young Living lavender, peppermint, Peace and Calming, lemongrass, Thieves and plenty of single oils to make blends for gout.
Many essential oils affect the skin and mucous membranes in ways that are valuable or harmful. Many essential oils, particularly tea tree oil, may cause contact dermatitis.[19][20][21][22] They are used in antiseptics and liniments in particular. Typically, they produce rubefacient irritation at first and then counterirritant numbness. Turpentine oil and camphor are two typical examples of oils that cause such effects. Menthol and some others produce a feeling of cold followed by a sense of burning. This is caused by its effect on heat-sensing nerve endings. Some essential oils, such as clove oil or eugenol, were popular for many hundred years in dentistry as antiseptics and local anesthetics.
There is some concern about pesticide residues in essential oils, particularly those used therapeutically. For this reason, many practitioners of aromatherapy buy organically produced oils. Not only are pesticides present in trace quantities, but also the oils themselves are used in tiny quantities and usually in high dilutions. Where there is a concern about pesticide residues in food essential oils, such as mint or orange oils, the proper criterion is not solely whether the material is organically produced, but whether it meets the government standards based on actual analysis of its pesticide content.[50]

Cold pressed – Plant materials that easily release their aromatic components can be cold pressed to extract the essential oils. This age-old method was commonly used for extracting citrus oils from their fruit skin. Manual extraction involved pressing the fruit with a sponge, which would eventually get saturated with the oil. These sponges were then pressed to obtain the oil. Today, mechanized processes are used for cold pressing, and the oil is separated from the oil-juice mixture obtained.
Many people struggle to get a good night’s sleep, but luckily for those who want to get more rest, there are a number of essential oils that can help to promote sleep. Lavender is one of the most well-known and commonly used treatments for sleep, but there are several others that can be of assistance; especially if Lavender isn’t preferred by the user.
Most of us need to watch how much we spend. It’s very tempting to buy essential oils from the companies that sell them for the lowest price. Price alone isn't an indication of quality, but it can be. Knowledgeable vendors that spend countless hours locating quality oils, pay the expensive fees to test their oils (refer to the links available towards the bottom of the page to learn more about essential oil testing) and provide the results to customers and provide free samples upon request should rightfully be charging more for their oils than retailers that stock oils that they've sourced from the cheapest sources.
Allelopathy occurs when a plant releases chemicals to prevent competing vegetation from growing within its area or zone. An often-cited example is in southern California, home to the dominant shrubs Salvia leucophylla (sage bush) and Artemisia californica (a type of sage). Both species release allelopathic terpenoids, eucalyptol and camphor, into the surrounding area, which effectively prevents other plant species from growing around them. This is allelopathy. Chemicals that deter competing growth (terpenes, for example) are referred to as allelochemics.
While I’m all about individual empowerment and autonomy, let’s consider this in a different light. Would we accept this model for any other type of medical/pharmaceutical sales? If I wanted to start a multi-level marketing company selling antibiotics for children and then allow anyone to sign up, sell and distribute to anyone that wanted my products, would that be okay? Beyond okay, would it be celebrated the same way that essential oils are? No, it wouldn’t. Most people would say that distributors selling antibiotics without any training, education, or regulation would be irresponsible. Yet, essential oils claim to be natural antibiotics all the time. It’s a double-standard.
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When applying an oil topically for the first time it’ a good idea to place one drop in an inconspicuous area to see how your skin reacts. To minimize skin sensitivity, mix with a few drops of Isagenix Coconut Application Oil. If skin discomfort or irritation occurs, discontinue use on the affected area. If the reaction persists it is best to consult with a doctor.
I bought a jar of mag chloride at WF and tried it as a for soak for him. It worked the very first night! However, that jar ( a little over a cup) was $15. am very frugal, (hence interested in this article) and after doing much shopping around I ordered a large bag of Ancient Minerals Magnesium Flakes from Amazon, and it works out so much less expensive that way. Now I use 1/2c in a gallon of the hottest water possible and he soaks for 30 minutes each night. No more cramps. BONUS: when he’s done, I reheat half of that water in the micro and soak my own feet in it. I have osteoarthritis and general soreness all over, and there is a significant difference in my pain level now, as well. Mag is a great anti inflammatory nutrient.
Sourced from the resin of Boswellia carterii or the Boswellia sacara tree, Frankincense oil might sound a bit scary, but it has nothing to do with the Frankenstein monster and is actually quite beneficial. When inhaled or absorbed through the skin, it has stress-busting properties, and when applied to the skin, it is also antibacterial, scar-healing and even age-fighting. “Frankincense oil stimulates the limbic region of brain, helping to overcome stress and uplift spirits,” explains Stritzler. In fact, one study by the Department of Nursing at Keimyung University in South Korea found that, when mixed with bergamot and lavender oils, frankincense oil was found to have positive effect on depression in hospice patients. Here are more natural remedies for depression.
To test if you’re sensitive to an essential oil (which is probably best to do before using it in a skincare preparation): Combine one drop of essential oil with 1/2 tsp carrier oil (like olive, jojoba, or sweet almond). Rub this on the inside, upper portion of your arm and wait a few hours. If no redness or itching develops, you’re most likely not sensitive to that essential oil.

Though little known in the western part of the world, Vertiver, also called the khus grass in India, is actually important to the east. This is a versatile, dense, and aromatic plant; and is often woven into baskets and floor mats. The leaves are used to feed livestock; the pulp to make paper; and its extract to make a natural pesticide. However, it’s traditionally used as Ayurvedic medicine.
Ylang ylang is another fruity oil that comes from a tropical tree in Southeast Asia. It slows the heart rate and reduces blood pressure, providing an overall calming effect for the nervous system helpful for individuals with sleep problems or depression. One study showed patients taking a combination of ylang ylang, lavender, and bergamot essential oils experience less stress and anxiety.
For each profiled oil, you will find information on its botanical name, common method of extraction, oil color, oil consistency, perfumery note, strength of the initial aroma, aromatic description, uses, constituents, and safety information. For most information provided, the data is based on the review of particular samples and could differ from your personal experience. As the uses, constituents and safety information data are subjects requiring research, specific references are provided.
Actually John, that isn’t entirely true. Unlike many products EOs are not required to list everything that is in them. Some grocery and drug store brands of EOs come already diluted only this isn’t mentioned on the bottle. You can unknowingly over dilute your EOs by adding additional carrier because you think the product you have gotten from the drugstore is pure.
Words like "natural" and "organic" get tossed around constantly in regards to beauty, food, and health products — but the truth is that these words don't mean much of anything right now. In America, there is no certified definition of the word "natural" when used on branding labels and ingredient lists, so companies can make these claims as often as they want with little repercussions.
I personally have a number of Aura Cacia's oils that I bought prior to really digging into oils.  I can't say anything except for my personal experience which is that they don't smell as potent as some of the other oils that I have.  I do like the company and I purchase from Frontier Co op regularly, but I'm not choosing to get my oils from them.   That being said, I think that they have a lot of great information about oils and their use.
EXCELLENT BUY!! As a herbalist and soap maker, I use a variety of oils from various companies all over the world. The price for these was SO low that I thought, at the very least, I could use them for aroma therapy. They arrived in a beautifully designed box - professionally labeled and WOW was I STUNNED - the fragrance of each one showed very little difference from my finest oils that I have paid MUCH more for! As I am not a chemist - I cannot vouch for the percentages of each constituent, but I can tell you that the oils from the set that I have used thus far - have shown themselves to be just as effective as the high dollar bottle I have bought elsewhere! EXCELLENT Job - I sure hope they restock soon - I am buying MORE!
According to Dr. Brian Lawrence “for an essential oil to be a true essential oil, it must be isolated by physical means only. The physical methods used are distillation (steam, steam/water and water) or expression (also known as cold pressing, a unique feature for citrus peel oils). There is one other method of oil isolation specific to a very limited number of essential oil plants. This is a maceration/distillation. In the process, the plant material is macerated in warm water to release the enzyme-bound essential oil. Examples of oils produced by maceration are onion, garlic, wintergreen, bitter almond, etc.”.2
Thank you so much for all of your information that you share. It seems like when I google something about essential oils, I frequently end up on your site. I am new to essential oils and not sure what to expect. It seems like when I use them in lotion, roll-on, or even a eucalyptus steam the scent dissipates relatively quickly. I am not sure if I am not adding enough essential oils, if I am buying lower quality essential oils, or if I am expecting too much. For instance, a 8 oz batch of lotion (I used 30 drops total of essential oil)that I made last week no longer has a scent to it (at least to me). Any insight on this?
Oh, and there’s no such thing as “Therapeutic grade” essential oils.  All that means is oils that haven’t been adulterated by adding carrier oils, etc. to them.  It’s a marketing ploy to make the oils seem purer than they are.  Really, “pure” essential oils are the bottom level of purity/safety.  Wilfcrafted and organic are the safest and most beneficial.

It turns out that for any of these companies to claim that their oil is 100% pure, only a very very small percentage of pure oil (less than 10% if I remember right) is required and the rest can be chemical additives. This particular company was one of the ones tested that did not mislead and did not have "filler" chemicals so that's why I personally made my purchase.
Low temperature and low pressure play an important part of collecting the highest quality essential oil. When plant matter is placed into a chamber and steam is injected, the plant’s essential oil is released into the air. The steam and essential oil are carried out of the chamber and cooled. The oil and water are then allowed to separate for collection.
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